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  • Category: General

    What is the difference between spoken English and written English?

    Members,
    Can you bring out the key difference between 'Spoken English' and 'Written English'? Is there any vast difference between these two English?

    We find only Spoken English classes. Why not Written English classes.
  • #575895
    There are certainly some difference between spoken English and written English. For example in spoken English you can talk in different ways to convince to the understanding level of listener including using some hard words. Where as in written English it must be legible and words used must be easy to understand. While speaking we cannot differentiate the spellings but while writing some spellings really matters. For example telling the word 'color" or colour" does not make difference but when writing we must write as colour and not as color. Those are sample differences I have mentioned.
    K Mohan
    I consider myself as the learner everyday

  • #575904
    There are four dimensions of learning a language - speaking and understanding which go together and reading and writing which also go together. Illiterate people of the countries where English is the native language, naturally know from the surroundings as to how to speak and understand English. Such people need not know reading and writing the language.

    However, in countries like ours where English is learnt as a second language, people have to learn all the four aspects though there may be few who only speak and understand without having the capability of reading and writing. Because of the long British rule, English is very much popular in India and it is one of the official languages of India.

    The basic difference between spoken language and written English is that spoken English is spoken only whereas the written English is written. I remember having read long back that the former President Giani Jail Singh used to take tuition of the spoken English in the Rashtrapati Bhavan . It was mentioned by Khuswant Singh in one of his books. I don't know exactly if it is a fact or a joke.

    Let us encourage each other in sharing knowledge.

  • #576594
    I have shiftd to punjab recently and observed that people are desperate to go abroad , and the only thing they lack is spoken english language skills. Few of them are exceptioanlly good when it comes to written english but they are very poor in speaking the language. In schools here even the faculty doesnot encourage english speaking amongst the children , even though they are teaching the language in schools. I was pretty shocked. I believe, right from the start they should encourage speaking the language more so that students can build a strong base over the spoken english skills. Their pronounciation is totally different and they fail to mould it to the correct pronounciation in the later years.

  • #576604
    There is a bit different in spoken and written; and that is due to the ascents. What we write in a sentence is quite same in comparison to British and American style. However, while speaking the words appear unique in British ascent, American ascent, Australian ascent, Asian ascent, etc.
    As a common we always write 'I want to go' while speaking it we say 'I wanna go'. There is no such meaning of 'wanna' to write in a sentence; but while speaking people use nowadays.
    Grammar is a part of spoken English. Before learning spoken English we must know the grammar part very well. However, while learning English it is not essential to learn the spoken skills. English grammar is being taught since lower classes in every school; due to which people little bit knows about the tenses, verbs, nouns, adjectives, prepositions, etc. So, written English classes are not required as spoken English is.

    Regards,
    Naresh Kumar
    'Every bad situation will have something positive. Even a dead clock shows correct time twice a day.'


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