You must Sign In to post a response.
  • Category: Miscellaneous

    Why the Judge sitting at higher level in court room?

    In a court room, If the Judge is seated at the same level as the defendant, would it make a difference in sentencing?

    Why the Judge is sitting at higher level?

    1. Because he is the boss
    2. He can see the court room, the lawyers, the defendants and prosecutors.
    3. It is an indication that If you don't like Judges ruling, you can go to "higher" court!
    4. It is a safer place for him
    5. All of the above
    6. None of the above

    Any fascinating answers?
  • #599372
    The judge remains at the higher pedestal in a courtroom because he is the master of the room. The judge is the ruler of his courtroom; the courtroom is his kingdom. The judge is superior to all others inside the courtroom.
    Caution: Explosive. Handle with care.

  • #599379
    Good question posed by the author. Normally when you are sitting on the high pedestal platform, you can have the overall view of the hall or room. And you have the exclusive view of watching every one moves and thus take action. In a court room when the arguments were going on the judge would be listening, but the audience would be disturbing with their laughs or even comments. So judge will have the full view and orders immediately the trouble maker to go out. Moreover when a judge sits on the top and gives orders, there is no other go but to oblige and accept the order. Normally in films in the court hall a statue of law is depicted with eyes tied. That means there wont be any partiality in dealing with the case as the law is concealing its face, the judgement would be on the lines of integrity and to support that the judge has to sit above the people watching the proceedings in the court hall.
    K Mohan
    'Idhuvum Kadandhu Pogum "
    Even this challenging situation would ease

  • #599401
    It is a common practice to have a dais for the performer, when many are gathered in a big hall. This will give a chance to see the performer all his audience. At the same time all audience can also see him. In a class room a teacher will generally have a raised platform to stand and teach to students. When there is a stage show, the stage will be at a higher level. Even a marriage is performed on a elevated platform only. For the same convenience in courts also the Judge will sit on a raised platform. It will enable him to have a view of all the people in the court hall and he can notice if something unwanted is going on. It is the responsibility of the Judge to see that peace is maintained in the court and unruly things should not happen.
    drrao
    always confident

  • #599442
    Court is a place to deal with two parties. The people who attend the court are divided as complainant and defiant . The lawyers are divided to argue in favour and against. Only the judge is a common man who is not of any party to give fair judgement. Hence he is kept separately in a elevated position to be seen and heard by all.
    No life without Sun

  • #599554
    In earlier times the kings ruled their countries and by default they were the judge in their respective court rooms. Naturally kings being supreme used to sit on an elevated platform. The kings are not there but the tradition of the judge sitting on a platform still continuing. In colonial times in many offices the incharge of the office used to sit in the big office room on a small elevated rectangular box. This was a common sight in post offices where the Post Master did not sit in a separate chamber but on an elevated rectangular box.
    Knowledge is power.

  • #599556
    I don't think there is any rule laid down in this connection and I am not aware about the history behind such a practice. But, we know that the lawyers, while arguing their case or when the witnesses depose their version before the court, need to stand up. In such a scenario, if the Court assemble in the same level, the Judge would be in a lower position and would have to look up to listen and note the evidence and arguments. In all probability, the practice must have been put in place to ensure that the Judge who is to hear a case need to be on a higher platform so that he gets a clear view of the court room and at the same time, as an official empowered to take a decision and pass an order and is guided by law and facts before him as such, is on a higher level than others present. I think the practice is more of a psychological approach.
    'Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance'- Confucius

  • #599557
    I think there are as many answers to this question corresponding to the different views.
    1. For psychological reasons. In a court room, the verdict of the judge is the final. He's equivalent to a king ordering his courtiers. All the lawyers, defendants and audience submit themselves before him and regard his supremacy. Do you think he can enjoy the same effect if he was made sit in the same level as the audience? Absolutely not.

    2. For logical reasons. There is every chance that the judge will be attacked in between the trial, because it's the best way to postpone the judgement. Sure in modern courts, the security is impregnable,but in the dawn of law and order systems, these attacks must have been higher in rate. So to defend himself the judge is seated high, surrounded by guards and jury.

    3. For the sake of better judgement: the judge will be able to analyze and observe the whole room with a vantage point. From his high seat he will be able to get a better view and make a better judgement.

    The stronger a light shines the darker are the shadows around it.


  • Sign In to post your comments