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  • Category: Miscellaneous

    What is the difference between cyclones, hurricanes and typhoons

    Even days after it has dissipated and withered off, Cyclone Ockhi continues to be in the news. That is because of the trauma the victims bear. There are still many missing to be traced. It is also now widely debated whether the loss of life now suffered could have been avoided had more early, precise warning was available or had warning been interpreted properly and acted upon, earlier.In ISC forum we discussed a thread on how cyclones are named.

    Now,in this regard, I remembered about an article What are Hurricanes and how to deal with it?" posted in ISC a few years ago . I think it is still relevant because Typhoons,Hurricanes and Cyclones are all same.

    They are one and same, but called differently at different places. They are same weather phenomenon under generic technical term tropical cyclones'. They are rotating, circling, circulating,spiralling strong high speed winds that originate in the tropical regions of the Oceans.

    Those occurring in the Western Pacific area are called 'Typhoons'.In the North Pacific and Atlantic Ocean they are called 'Hurricanes'.Those originating in the Indian Ocean and South Pacific Ocean area are called Severe cyclonic storms or simply 'cyclones'.

    When winds attain and exceed a sustained average speed of 62 km/hr they are termed as cyclones and given name from the list as per norms.

    As Ockhi originated in the Indian Ocean it was called a cyclone.
  • #618531
    Yes. Cyclones are whirling winds. And names of cyclones are different in different languages.
    And each cyclone is named. I can guess why. If in some unfortunate circumstance a cyclone is accompanied by other, we can be extra vigile.
    And calling a cyclone by name will help us scale the damage.

    The stronger a light shines the darker are the shadows around it.

  • #618638
    Its all same with different name. Interestingly in cricket game these words are used for nick name to furious fast bowler. Like our own Kapil Dev was called "Haryana Harricane". England's test cricketer Frank Tyson was called "typhoon".

  • #618644
    Nice information about these extreme weather events that lay a path of destruction. It's a reminder that however developed or advanced we humans can be, nature's fury is something to be respected and be aware of. The more casual we are (about warnings,underestimating the event), the more is the price we pay. To me the names don't mater much as region big or small, irrespective of its location can be bought to its knees if nature wants to.

  • #618646
    Good information. These words are similar..The different places they are called differently. A very commonly known word is cyclone.
    drrao
    always confident

  • #618717
    Basically all are storms from big to very big, great and vast. We Indians call it as cyclone in our region. The speed of hurricane is higher than cyclone, and the speed of typhoon is higher than hurricane.
    No life without Sun

  • #618720
    Hurricanes generally form in North Atlantic Ocean or North East Pacific Ocean. Typhoon develops in north western part of Pacific Ocean. Cyclones are forming in the tropics.

    I would like to say here that natural disasters are changing the way we look into our history. Sometimes they make humanity in the state of amnesia or sometimes they give signals to our past.
    One interesting observation after the Chennai tsunami in 2004 was that, just after the Tsunami the sea water receded backwards about 6 to 8 km. Many people saw a long raw of granite wall, many manmade structures, a beautiful city, including roads etc emerge from the sea, before it was swallowed again as the water hurtled backward. That was the glimpse of our past! It was reported by former BBC Channel IV correspondent and television presenter Mr. Graham Hancock. After more than a decade later a team of scientists of marine Archeological department, Goa, along with divers, Mr Graham Hancock uncovered what the eyewitnesses saw that fateful day. He says, he was not allowed to publish his report by Govt of India fearing public backlash. You can have the detailed account of this investigation in his book 'The Magicians of the God' and 'The Underworld'. An interesting read. His investigation report points towards the 'Kumery Kandam' myth. I have a plan to visit Mahabalipuram coast to know more about it.


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