You must Sign In to post a response.
  • Category: Miscellaneous

    When plants grow from seeds then how seedless grapes grows ?

    We all know that for raising a plant we need the seed of such plant or the sapling variety of such plant to grow. But when you take the seedless grapes, there are no seeds inside and how the grapes are grown further. Grapes are the creepers and once the season is over, the creepers would die and new ones has to be brought. I would like the specific answer for this question from the members who know about the fact. And what is the difference between the black seedless grapes and green seedless grapes ?
  • #625217
    Plants can also be grown from cuttings. That is how most people grow rose plants - they get a cutting and place it in the soil. Grafting is another way in which we can get new plants. Here a cut is made on the node of a branch and wrapped with soil and watered daily. In a few days, roots emerge at the spot and the branch is chopped off and planted to start a new plant.

    In the case of seedless grapes, a cutting is taken from the vine and planted. These days horticulturists use rooting hormones to quicken the process.

    Grape vines just wither when the conditions are unfavourable. In places where they are grown, they continue to survive around the year. It would take too much time for a sapling to grow big enough to give fruit.

    "A love affair with knowledge will never end in heartbreak" - Michael Garrett Marino

  • #625218
    This is a question everybody can raise. In the case of ' seedless' grapes the fact is that it is not seedless. It has underdeveloped seeds inside. Biologically it is a phenomenon known as " stenospermocarpy" which causes the grapevine to be seedless. These seeds within the fruits are so small, almost invisible. The routine pollination and other things are needed for this varieties too. Certain people believe this variety is as a result of laboratory experiments. It is wrong. It is hundred percent natural.
    T.M.Sankaran
    Gold Member ISC

  • #625260
    I thought these were genetically modified varieties, thanks to the above two replies that have change my knowledge of small seedless grapes.

  • #625267
    Well, something I had in mind but never had gone though in so much depth.

    The biological occurrence known as "STENOSPERMOCARPY" is what causes the berries of grape vines to be seedless. More accurately, this is a mechanism in the plant that generates underdeveloped seeds, or tiny seeds that are barely visible, within the fruit.

    And surprisingly, the absence of seeds does not affect the reproduction because, like other species of trees or plants, it reproduces through cuttings & grafting as well.

    If we try to give one scientific explanation then, new plants can also be made from existing plants wherein the adult grape plant stems are sliced diagonally and cut into sections. The cut ends are then dipped into a rooting hormone and planted. The new plants that begin to grow are basically genetic clones of the original parent plant. The scientists can grow plant of different other fruits or species in this way.

    Even this myself did during school days for one of the science projects. Although not successful that time but at least have contributed for the above briefings.

  • #625279
    It is true that some plants are grown by cuttings. Many flower plants will be grown by planting the cuttings. How these seedless grapes are grown are clearly explained and it is a learning form me.
    drrao
    always confident

  • #625315
    Many vines grow from the cut pieces taken from a growing parent vine.
    The common courtyard Jasmine is also grown and cultivated like that. Many vegetables, tubers and flowering plants are planted and grown like that. For Tapioca or Sugarcane, it is the stem that is used for further planting.In the vines one common example is the betel vine and pepper. For certain crops just when the harvest is nearing a separate arrangement is made to grow the next crop by growing the cut stems or cut creeper vine.


  • Sign In to post your comments