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University of Delhi - B.A.(H) Restruc. Syllabus


Posted Date: 17-Jun-2008  Last Updated:   Category: Syllabus    
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1
The Restructed B.A. Honours Programme
Effective from July 2005
University of Delhi
2
CONTENTS
Page
Guidelines 1-8
Language Credit Courses 9-26
Language Qualifying Courses 27-42
In Lieu of Compulsory Language Courses 43-48
Inter-Disciplinary Courses 49-65
Discipline Centred Courses 66-134
3
GUIDELINES FOR THE RESTRUCTURED B.A. HONOURS
PROGRAMME
W.E.F. 2005
CONCURRENT COURSES
Introduction
The Restructured B.A. Honours Programme will come into effect from
July 2005. The Programme will replace the earlier B.A. Honours
Programme in respect to what were earlier called subsidiary courses.
Subsidiary courses are now known as Concurrent courses. The
Academic Council of the University of Delhi adopted the report of
the B.A. Honours Restructuring Committee set up by the Vice
Chancellor in its meeting held on 11/12 October, 2004. Subsequently
University Departments drafted courses in their respective fields.
The first set of courses were approved by the Academic Council at
its meeting held on 17th March, 2005 and the second set of courses was
approved on 23rd April, 2005.
Perspective
Concurrent courses are of tremendous importance to any student pursuing
an Honours degree in one subject. In the absence of stimulating,
informed and cross-fertilising subsidiary courses, which expose the
student to a range of challenging academic debates in areas other
than the one covered by the main subject, the student tends to get
over-specialized in one discipline. He or she is thereby predisposed
to acquire for that reason a narrow vision. However, today no
discipline can afford to be self-referential, since the academic
concerns of any discipline both overlap with and are embedded in
wider concerns of social sciences and humanities. Consequently, the
objectives of the Restructured B.A. (Hons.) Programme are:
* To put in place structures whereby students can be made familiar
with development in knowledge in fields related to his or her main
discipline.
* To develop critical social awareness; which is the prime aim of a
liberal university education.
4
* To allow students to understand and evaluate issues that are of
great relevance of his or her everyday existence such as environment
or the democratic functioning of a plural society.
Keeping these objectives in view, the status of subsidiaries has been
upgraded to that of concurrent courses and the marks of the concurrent
courses shall count in the final result of the student. However, the course
contents of the main discipline courses have been left untouched.
The essentials of the Restructured B.A. (Hons.) Programme with respect
to Concurrent Courses are given in the following pages:
Structure of Concurrent Courses
Each student will be required to take four credit courses, and one qualifying
course.
Concurrent courses have four components
1 Language credit course
2 Qualifying course
3 Interdisciplinary course
4 Discipline centred course
* In the first year a student shall offer 1, 2 and 3.
* In the second year a student shall offer two discipline centred courses
out of the various options provided.
Marks
* Each course carries 50 marks: annual examination 38 marks,
internal assessments 12 marks.
* Total marks : 200
* The pass mark for the credit courses is 40 percent.
* The pass mark for the qualifying courses is 36 percent. A student
has to pass in the qualifying course to be eligible for Honours
degree; however, the marks in this course will not be counted in
the final division awarded.
5
Time
2 hours per week or 2 classes for all concurrent courses plus 1 hour of
consultation/tutorials. Tutorials will be held fortnightly for students.
Internal Assessments will be held for credit but not for the qualifying
course.
Promotion Rules
The minimum marks required to pass the examination at the end of each
year shall be 40% in the aggregate as in the main discipline courses of the
existing B.A. (Hons.) Programme. The promotion rules for the main
discipline of B.A. (Hons.) shall be applicable to all concurrent credit courses.
The minimum marks required to pass the qualifying language courses shall
be 36%.
Ordinance relating to B.A. Honours Programme
Amendment to Appendix II to Ordinance-V(2) and VII relating to B.A.
(Hons.) Programme Examination (Page 43 of the University Calendar,
Volume II, 1989).
With the implementation of this B.A. (Hons.) Programme, the existing B.A.
(Hons.) Programme with respect to subsidiary courses shall stand
discontinued w.e.f. July 2005.
Those admitted to the B.A. (Hons.) on or before 2004 shall be governed by the
provisions of the earlier Ordinance till the expiry of the respective span period.
The Restructured B.A. (Hons.) Programme, as approved by the Academic
Council at its meeting held on 11/12 October, 2004 vide Resolution No. 69
and the Executive Council at its meeting held on 25 October, 2004 vide
Resolution No. 141 (1), be also applicable to : (i) B.A. (Hons.) Mathematics
starting from the academic year July 2005 until the Department of
Mathematics restructures its B.A. (Hons.) and B.Sc. (Hons.) Mathematics
Courses; and (ii) B.A. (Hons.) - Hindustani Music/Karnatak Music starting
from the academic year July 2005.
The Inter-disciplinary Course of the Restructured B.A. (Hons.) Programme -
Mathematical Awareness shall not be available to the students admitted to
the B.A. (Hons.) Mathematics Course and shall be offered to students
who studied mathematics upto secondary level and admitted in the first
year of B.A. (Hons.) in disciplines other than Mathematics.
6
The erstwhile subsidiary courses of B.A (Hons.) Mathematics and B.A. (Hons.)
Hindustani Music/Karnatak Music shall stand discontinued w.e.f. 2005-2006.
The erstwhile subsidiary course, Music offered to the students of B.A.
(Hons.) in Humanities, Social Sciences and Mathematics shall stand
discontinued w.e.f. July 2005 and the Faculty will formulate a discipline
centred concurrent course in Music and will be placed before the AC/EC
for consideration so that this course will be available from the academic
session 2006-2007.
Components
First Year Honours in subjects other than Literature
Students will offer
* One compulsory language course from any of the following :
1 English
2 Hindi
3 Urdu
4 Persian
5 Punjabi
6 Bengali
7 Marathi
8 Tamil
9. Telugu
10. Assamese
11. Sanskrit
Note
Students who have not studied any of the languages after Class VIII, or if
the language they have studied beyond Class VIII is not offered by the
College, will not be required to take the compulsory course in a language.
Instead they will opt for one of the interdisciplinary courses in lieu thereof.
* Qualifying Course
Students will offer one qualifying course in any language other than the one
offered above.
For example, if a student chooses English as a compulsory language course,
he or she shall be required to offer one qualifying course from Hindi or any
other Indian language or vice-versa. The options are
7
1 English [Higher/Lower]
2 Hindi [Higher/Lower]
3 Urdu [Higher/Lower]
4 Bengali
5 Marathi
6 Tamil
7. Telugu
8. Assamese
9. Sanskrit
* Honours students in subjects other than language/literature who opt
for the compulsory language course in say English will offer the
higher qualifying course in Hindi and vice versa.
* Honours students in subjects other than language/literature shall take the
lower course if they have studied the language only upto class VIII.
* Students who have not studied any of the languages after Class
VIII, or if the language they have studied beyond Class VIII is not
offered by the College, will not be required to take the qualifying
course in a language. Instead they will opt for one of the
interdisciplinary courses in lieu thereof.
First Year Honours in Literature
A student who is enrolled in a B.A. (Hons.) course where a literature
subject is the main discipline (namely, English, Hindi, Urdu, Bengali, Sanskrit,
Punjabi, Arabic, Persian) shall not be required to take a Compulsory
Language Course.
He/she can opt for one of the following in lieu of a compulsory language :
The Individual and Society. English Department
Or
Hindi Language, Literature Hindi Department
and Culture.
Such students may opt for a language course provided it is not the same
language as the main discipline.
Qualifying Course: For Language/Literature students, the qualifying,
language course has to be chosen from among the remaining languages
(i.e. neither the language of the main discipline nor the one chosen as
a language course for credit).
8
First Year: All Honours
* All First Year Honours Students are required to opt for one of the
following interdisciplinary concurrent courses.
* Those literature honours students who have offered 4(a) or (b) in
lieu of compulsory language cannot offer this set of courses as an option.
Interdisciplinary concurrent Nodal Department
courses:
1. Ethics in the Public Domain Philosophy Department
2. Environmental Issues in India History Department
3. Reading Gandhi Political Science Department
4. The Individual and Society (a) English Department
or
Hindi Language, (b) Hindi Department
Literature, and Culture
5. Gender and Society Sociology Department
6. Mathematical Awareness M a t h e m a t i c s
Department
Note
Individual departments are responsible for administering the
course. Teachers from other departments can contribute to the
teaching of the course, if needed.
Second Year : All Honours
* All students will opt for any two of the following discipline centred
concurrent courses.
* These courses should be in subjects other than their main discipline.
* In those subjects where more than one discipline centred course
is offered, the student shall opt for one of the course.
Discipline centred courses Nodal Department
1. Psychology for Living Psychology Department
2. Urdu Literature Urdu Department
3. Persian Literature Persian Department
4. Hindi Literature Hindi Department
9
5. Modern Indian Literature, English Department
Poems, and Short Stories;
Novel or Play
Or
Cultural Diversity, Linguistic
Plurality and Literary
Traditions in India
6. Punjabi Literature Punjabi Department
7. Sanskrit Literature Sanskrit Department
8. Students can offer one course Philosophy Department
out of the following:
(i) Formal Logic or Symbolic
Logic
(ii) Philosophical Investigations
(Readings in Western
Philosophy)
(iii) Theories of Consciousness
(Readings in Classical
Indian Philosophy)
9. Citizenship in a Globalizing Political Science Department
World
10. Group A may be offered for History Department
a four year period 2005-2009
and then Group B in rotation:
(i) Culture in India: A Historical
Perspective
(ii) Delhi: Ancient/Medieval/
Modern
(iii) Religion and Religiosity
in India
(iv) Inequality and Difference
in India
11. Sociology of Contemporary Sociology Department
India
10
12. Anyone of the following: Geography Department
(i) Principles of Geography
or
(ii) Geography of India
13. Mathematics Department
For Honours other than Economics Honours
13a Algebra and Calculus
or
l3b Mathematical Methods
For Economic Honours
13c Elements of Analysis
or
13d Linear Algebra and Calculus
14 Course yet to be approved Economics Department
11
LANGUAGE CREDIT COURSES
12
ENGLISH
Comtemporary English : An Anthology for Undergraduates I (Delhi
: Oxford University Press 1991)
Note : However, the course will use only fourteen out of the twenty-eight
readings in this textbook. The deleted authors are : Gerald Durrell,
W.B. Yeats, R.A. Robinson, Vikram Seth, Rabindranath Tagore,
Nissim Ezekiel, Arthur C. Clarke, Chidananda Dasgupta, Keki
Daruwalla, James Matthews, Ray Bradbury, Eugene lonesco, David
Campton.
The course aims at developing comprehension and composition
skills through exposure to samples of writing in English, carefully
graded according to the level of grammatical, lexical and rhetorical
complexity. Emphasis will be laid on analysis of texts, with special
attention to the unity of paragraphs and transition between
paragraphs, identification of topic sentences and general argument
etc. Rhetorical methods employed in narration, description, and
exposition will also be introduced. Composition exercises would
include various kinds of writing styles such as description, narration,
definition, and dialogue and special attention will be paid to
vocabulary enrichment.
fganh
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I fgUnh Hkk"kk dk fodkl % ifjp; vad&15@20 ihfj;M
¼v½ iwoZihfBdk % vk/kqfud Hkkjrh; Hkk"kkvksa dk fodkl
¼c½ e/;dkyhu fgUnh ds fofo/k :i
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fe?kufj;ksa dh Hkwfedk
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jktk f?ko izlkn flrkjs fgUn] HkkjrsUnq
gfj?pUnz] j k t k y { e . k
flag vkfn dk ;ksxnku
lkekftd&lkaLd`frd laLFkk,¡ vkSj fgUnh
&vk;Zlekt] ukxjh izpkfj.kh lHkk bR;kfn
13
lkfgfR;d fgUnh dk Lo:i %
¼1½ lkfgfR;d i=&if=dkvksa esa fgUnh dk Lo:i
¼2½ [kM+h cksyh dk dkO; Hkk"kk d s :i ea s fodkl
jk"Vªh; vkUnksyu esa fgUnh dh Hkwfedk
vkt+knh ds ckn & fgUnh dk vf[ky Hkkjrh;
Lo:i
& jk"VªHkk"kk] jktHkk"kk] lEidZ Hkk"kk] ekud
Hkk"kk
& fgUnh dh varjkZ"Vªh; O;kfIr
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& fizaV ehfM;k&¼nSfud ,oa lkIrkfgd
i=ksa dh Hkk"kk½
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& bysDVªkWfud ehfM;k
& jsfM;ks ¼lekpkj] foKkiu] euksjatu]
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& Vsyhfotu ¼lekpkj] foKkiu] euksjatu]
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&baVjusV dh fgUnh] ,l-,e-,l- dh fgUnh
¼lgk;d lkexzh foHkkx }kjk rS;kj dh tk,xh½
III ikfjHkkf"kd 'kCnkoyh ,oa vuqokn vad&10@5 ihfj;M
(i) ikfjHkkf"kd 'kCnkoyh
(ii) vaxzsth ds vuqPNsn dk fgUnh esa vuqokn
14
ikfjHkkf"kd 'kCn&lwph
1. Audience
2. Audio-Visual display
3. Audition
4. Authentic
5. Authority
6. Autograph
7. Autonomous
8. Awareness
9. Bearer
10. Bonafide
11. Bureaucracy
12. Bye-law
13. Capital
14. Cash sheet
15. Charge
16. Circular
17. Class-struggle
18. Clearing
19. Cognition
20. Commission
21. Compensaton
22. Complex
23. Comfirmation
24. Contract
25. Currency
26. Current Account
27. Depositor
28. Diagnosis
29. Dialectics
30. Direction
31. Discretion
32. Dispatcher
33. Dividend
34. Editorial
35. Empire
36. Enclosure
37. Endorsement
38. Enforcement
39. Epistemology
40. Feudalism
41. Finance
42. Fiscal year
43. Globlisation
44. Good will
45. Guaranty
46. Honorarium
47. Idea
48. Image
49. Indentity
50. Infrastructure
51. Instinct
52. Investment
53. Labour-force
54. Land-relations
55. Lumpsum
56. Management
57. Means of production
58. Memoramdum
59. Metaphor
60. Metaphysics
61. Mobilisation
62. Mode of production
63. Modus operandi
64. Mortagage
65. Multinational
66. Non-allignment
15
67. Notification
68. Out of stock
69. Outut
70. Outstanding
71. Owners
72. Panel
73. Patnership
74. Payable
75. Payment
76. Perception
77. Pervert
78. Poetic justice
79. Postponement
80. Pre-history
81. Proceedings
82. Production-relation
83. Prognosis
84. Purgation
85. Qualitative
86. Quality certificate
87. Quantitative
88. Recommendation
89. Record
90. Recovery of dues
91. Rectification
92. Renewal
93. Rental value
94. Repression
95. Reservation
96. Resistance
97. Resources
98. Restoration
99. Revenue
100. Sensex
101. Short-term credit
102. Small Savings
103. Squeeze
104. Stagnation
105. Sublimation
106. Sur-charge
107. Telecommunication
108. Third Party
109. Transaction
110. Transition
111. Treasury
112. Tropes
113. Typical
114. Unconscious
115. Undertaking
116. Validity
117. Variation
118. Verification
119. Vision
120. White-paper
121. Winding up
122. Withdrawal
123. World-association
124. Working capital
125. Yellow journalism
16
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¼okrkZ] Qhpj] iVdFkk] 'kh"kZd ys[ku] Lyksxu
lekpkj ys[ku] foKkiu ys[ku vkfn½
lgk;d&xazFk
1- fganh Hkk"kk dk bfrgkl & /khjsUnz oekZ
2- Hkkjr dh Hkk"kk&leL;k & jkefoykl 'kekZ
3- fganh Hkk"kk % lajpuk ds fofo/k vk;ke & johUnzukFk JhokLro
4- Hkkjr dh Hkk"kk,¡ & jktey cksjk
5- fganh Hkk"kk dh mn~xe vkSj fodkl & mn;ukjk;.k frokjh
6- lekpkj laiknu vkSj i`"BlTtk & jes'k dqekj tSu
7- lekpkj i= % eqnz.k vkSj lktlTTkk & ';ke lqanj 'kekZ
8- lekpkj&ladyu vkSj ys[ku & uanfd'kksj f=[kk
9- jsfM;ks okrkZ f'kYi & fl)ukFk dqekj
10-jsfM;ks izlkj.k & dkS'ky 'kekZ
11-jsfM;ks ukVd & m"kk lDlsuk
12-jsfM;ks vkSj nwjn'kZu i=dkfjrk & gfjeksgu
13-czsd ds ckn & lq/kh"k ipkSjh
14-foKkiu dh nqfu;k & dqeqn 'kekZ
15-lekpkj Qhpj ys[ku ,oa laiknu dyk & gfjeksgu
17
URDU
Unit-1 Urdu Ki Adabi Tehrikat 10 Marks / 20 Lectures
(a) Aligarh Tehreek
(b) Roomani Tehreek
(c) Taraqqui Pasand Tehreek
(d) Jadidyat
Unit-2 Azadi Ke Bad Urdu Sher-o-Adab 10 Marks / 20 Lectures
(a) Urdu Ghaza1
(b) Urdu Nazm
(c) Urdu Novel
(d) Urdu Afsana
(e) Urdu Drama
Unit-3 A wami Zaraye Tarseel Mein Urdu 10 Marks / 10 Lectures
(a) Introduction of Mass Media
Print Media & Electronic Media
(b) Study and Practice of :
(i) Khabar Nigari
(ii) Feature Nigari
(iii) Interview
Unit-4 Adabi Istilahat Ki Farhang 8 Marks / 10 Lectures
(a) English Terms Aur Unke Urdu
Mutaradifat
Recommended Books
(1) Sir Syed Aur Unke Namwar Rufaqa, By Syed Abdullah, Pub.
Educational Book House, Aligarh.
(2) Classikiyat Aur Roomaniyat, By Ali Jawed, Pub. Writers’ Guild India,
Delhi.
(3) Urdu Mein Taraqqui Pasand Adabi Tehreek, By Khalilul Rehman Azmi,
Pub. Educational Book House, Aligarh.
(4) Jadeediyat Aur Adab, By AI-e-Ahmed Suroor, Pub. Department of
Urdu, A.M.U., Aligarh.
(5) Urdu Adab Azadi Ke Baad, By Khurshidul Islam, A.M.U., Aligarh.
18
(6) Biswien Sadi Mein Urdu Adab, By Gopichand Narang, Pub. Sahitya
Akademy, New Delhi.
(7) Urdu Adab Azadi Ke Baad, By Mohammed Zakir, Pub. Maktaba Jamia
Ltd., New Delhi.
(8) Awami Zaraye Iblagh Aur Taleem-o-Taraqqui, By Devender Isser,
Pub. N.C.P.U .L., New Delhi.
(9) Rehbar-e-Akhbaar Naweesi, By Syed Iqbal Qadri, Pub. N.C.P.U.L.,
New Delhi.
(10) Iblaghiyat, By Mohd. Shahid Husain, Pub. Educational Publishing
House, Delhi.
* Attendance (2) Home Examinations (5) Assignment (5) =12 Marks
19
PERSIAN
Unit - I
Persian Languate (Prose)
Farsi Barai Ghair-e-Farsi Zabanan by Samina Baghcheban 08
The following chapters :
1,2,3,4,5,16,19,25,26, 27, 28, 35, 36.
Unit-II
Persian Language (Poetry) 08
1. Shahnameh-e-Firdousi 50 opening verses
2. Rubaiyat-e-Khayyam 10 first Rubaiyat
3. Hafiz-e-Shirazi First 05 ghazals
4. Bahar Chashm-o-Sang, Dar Rah-e-Ishq
Unit-III
Grammar
Verb (all tenses) 06
Ism-e-Fa'il
Ism-e-Maful
Sifat wa Mausuf
Wahid wa Jama
Morakkebat-e-Adabi
Tashbih
Iste'era
Muzaf
Muzaf Elaih
Zamir
Quad
Unit-IV
1. Fill in the blanks 06
Unit-V
Translation and Vacabulary
(a) Translation of an unseen English passage into Persian.
(b) Translation of an unseen Persian passage into English.
20
(c) Meaning of the following words:
Communication, Defence, External Affairs, Accountancy, Culture,
Atomic Energy, Electricity, Talk, Orbit, Satellite, Artillery, Missile,
Shipping, Aircraft, Mobile, Pilot, Cinema, History, Architecture,
Engineer, Monuments, Archives, Museum, Zoology, Linguistics,
Sociology, Operation, Nurse, Attendant, Patient, File, Library,
Competition, Stationary, Award, Furniture, PM, MP, Advocate,
Assembly, Chief Minister, Supreme Court, Chief Justice, Self, Bank,
Cheque, Ticket, Foreign Exchange, Receipt, Journal, Mutual Relation.
Internal Assessment 12
a) Attendance 02
b) Assignment 05
c) Home Examination 05
21
PUNJABI
1. Punjabi pattarkari da itihaas, rozana Punjabi akhbaran da daut. Khabn
Seway an ate agencian, electronic pattarkari, pattarkarita de kaushal
(Khabran da ikatrikaran, sampadan, vishesh lekh rachna, feature
lekhan, review, mulankan 8 marks
2. Punjabi cinema da bunyadi sankalp, cinemaee bimb, sampadan shellian
pachhmi te bharati cinemaee vidhavan, darshakpan ate sweekriti, star
da bimb ate prashansak sabhiachar. 8 marks
3. Radio te television da takniki vikas, cassettan, C.D.'s, video filman,
internet, sangeetak vidhvan, mandian ate sambandhit sanskritian
(classical, Punjabi folk, Punjabi pop ate rock), ishtiharbazi, programman
di viharik samikhaya 6 marks
4. Punjabi prakashan media vich ishtiharbazi, radio duara ishtiharbazi,
visual ate electronic media, ishtiharbazi de rachna-path ate samajik
manovigian, prashaski dhang. 8 marks
5. Anuvad da sarup, khetar, prakiriya ate vidhi, daftari Punjabi ate anuvad,
jan-sanchar madhiaman da anuvad, ishtihasbazi vich anuvad, sahitanuvad,
vigianik- takniki khetran vich anuvad, khatan, dastavezan de
anuvad, dobhasie di pravidhi 8 marks
Recommended Books
1. Punjabi Sanchar Yogta Abhias, Punjab State University Text-book
Board, Chandigarh.
2. Gill, M.K., Viharik Punjabi, Surjit Book Depot, Delhi.
3. Grover, D.R., Suchna-Sewavaan, Punjabi University, Patiala.
4. Waraich, Amarjit, Ih Akashvani Ein, Punjabi University, Patiala.
5. Behl, Navnindra, Rangmanch ate Television Nanak, Punjabi
Academy, Delhi.
6. Sushil Kumar, Anuvad da Sumvad, Udan Publishers, Mansa, 2003.
22
BENGALI
A. Credit Course - I
(a) A novel - 15 marks
'Pather Panchali' by Bibhuti
Bhusan Bandopadhyay
(b) A long poem (1) - 15 marks
'Karna-Kunti Samvad' by
Rabindranath Tagore
(c) Translation from English to the - 8 marks
concerned Indian language
Students will have to translate a
passage from English to Bengali
[There will be five questions in total. The students will be expected to
answer 2 questions from the novel, 2 questions from poetry. There will be
one English passage to be translated into the concerned Indian language.]
B. Credit Coruse - II
(a) An autobiography - 15 marks
Jibansmriti by Rabindranath
Tagore
(b) A play - 15 marks
Buro saliker Ghade Ro by
Madhusudan Datta
(c) Format of journalism - 8 marks
Letters to the Editor, Editorial
Reportage
[There will be five questions in total. The students will be required to
answer 2 questions from the autobiography, 2 questions from play. One
question from journalism - Letter to the editor/writing an editorial/reportage.]
23
MARATHI
A. Credit Course - I
(a) A novel - 15 marks
Gharagangechya Kathi by Jyotsna
Devdhar Popular Prakashan,
Mumbai.
(b) A long poem - 15 marks
Virahatarang by Madhav Julian
Venus Prakashan, Pune
(c) Translation from English to - 8 marks
Marathi
[There will be five questions in total. The students will be expected to
answer 2 questions from the novel, 2 questions from poetry. There will be
one English passage to be translated into the concerned Indian language.]
B. Credit Course - II
(a) An autobiography - 15 marks
Ramnagari by Ram Nagarkar
Majestic Prakashan, Pune
(b) A play - 15 marks
Natasamrat by V.V. Shirwadkar
Popular Prakashan, Mumbai
(c) Format of journalism in Marathi - 8 marks
[There will be five questions in total. The students will be required to
answer 2 questions from the autobiography, 2 questions from play. One
question from journalism - Letter to the editor/writing an editorial/reportage.]
24
TAMIL
A. Credit Course - I
(a) A novel - 15 marks
Sennel by Solai Sundara Perumal
Kamalam Pathippakam
Thiruvaarur Year : 1999 (F.E.)
(b) A long poem - 15 marks
Thaippaavai by Kannadhasan
Vanathi Pathippakam Chennai
Year : 1988 (9th Edn.)
(c) Translation from English to Tamil - 8 marks
(No. of question : 2+2+1=5)
[There will be five questions in total. The students will be expected to
answer 2 questions from the novel, 2 questions from poetry. There will be
one English passage to be translated into the concerned Indian language.]
B. Credit Course - II
(a) An autobiography - 15 marks
Ithuvarai Naan by Vairamuthu
Soorya Literature Pvt. Ltd. Trust
Puram Chennai
Year : 1992 (6th Edn.)
(b) A play (Drama) - 15 marks
Kumara Kurubara
by Bharathidhasan Kaavya
Bangalore, Year : 1995
(c) Format of journalism - 8 marks
Letters to the Editor, Editorial,
Reporter Ref. Book : Ithazhiyal
Kalai Ma. Pa. Kurusami
Thiruchendur, Year 1988 (F.E.)
25
TELUGU
Credit Course-I
(a) A novel 15 marks
'Vadlaginjalu' by Sripada
Subrahmanya Sastry
Published by EMESCO
Publications. Available at A.P.
Book Distributors, Secunderabad.
(b) A long poem (1) 15 marks
'Viswambhara' by Dr. C.
Narayana Reddy, Visalandhra
Publishers Hyderabad.
(c) Translation from English to Telugu. 8 marks
[There will be five questions in total. The students will be expected to
answer 2 questions from the novel, 2 questions from poetry. There will be
one English passage to be translated into the concerned Indian language.]
Credit Course - II
(a) An autobiography -- 15 marks
Na Jeevitha Yathra by Tanguturi
Prakasam Panthulu
Chapters :
1. Anati Rajamahendra Varam
2. Natakalu
3. Municipal Rajakiyalu
4. Swarajya Patrika
5. Hindu Mahammadiya Sanghika Poratalu
6. Gunturuzillalo Pannula Nirakarna
7. Mathavargala Madhya
Malli Malli Kalahalu
26
Published by EMESCO
Publications, Machili Patnam
Available at A.P. Book
Distributions - SD.
(b) A play - 15 marks
Nijam by Rachakonda Viswanatha
Sastry
Navayuga Publishers, Vijayawada
(c) Format of journalism - 8 marks
News - Collection
News - Writing
Lead - Body
Editor - Editorial
Features Writing
Interviews
Letters to the Editor
Ref. Book : Samacharala Chera Vetha by Prof. S.G.D. Chandra
Sekhar, Department of Telugu, S.V. University, Tirupati
[There will be five questions in total. The students will be required to
answer 2 questions from the autobiography, 2 questions from play. One
question from journalism - Letter to the editor/writing an editorial/reportage.]
27
ASSAMESE
Credit Course - I
(a) A novel -- 15 marks
'Jivanar Batat' by B.K. Baruah
(b) A long poem (1) -- 15 marks
'Ravan' by Naba Kanta Baruah
(c) Translation from English to the -- 8 marks
concerned Indian language.
Students will have to translate a passage from English to Assamese
[There will be five questions in total. The students will be expected to
answer, 2 questions from the novel, 2 questions from poetry. There will be
one English passage to be translated into the concerned Indian language.]
Credit Course-II
(a) An autobiography -- 15 marks
Mor Jivanar Sanwarn
(b) A play -- 15 marks
Karengur Ligiri by Jyoti Prasad
Agarwalla
(c) Format of journalism -- 8 marks
Letter to the Editor, Editorial Reportage
[There will be five questions in total. The students will be required to
answer 2 questions from the autobiography, 2 questions from play. One
questions from journalism-Letter to the editor/writing an editorial/reportage.]
28
SANSKRIT
Time 2 hrs. per week
1- j?kqoa'ke~ ¼Hkkl½
¼lanHkZ vFkZ O;k[;k ,oa ikB~;ka'k ij vk/kkfjr iz'u½
2- nwrokD;e~ ¼Hkkl½
¼ljykFkZ ,oa xzUFk ij vk/kkfjr iz'u½
3- O;kdj.k
1- dkjd ¼okD; jpuk ,oa v'kqf);ksa dk la'kks/ku½
2- vuqokn ¼ljy½
lgk;d xzUFk lwph %&
1- j?kqoa'ke~ ¼izFkelxZ½ dkfynkl
2- nwrokD;e~ Hkkl
3- vuqoknpfUnzdk pØ/kj ukSfV;ky
4- gk;j laLd`r xzkej ¼fgUnh vuqokn½ ,e- vkj- dkys
5- laLd`r lkfgR; dk bfrgkl dfiy nso f}osnh
6- laLd`r lkfgR; dk bfrgkl cynso mik/;k;
7- laLd`r lkfgR; dh :ijs[kk pUnz'ks[kj ik.Ms; ,oa O;kl
29
LANGUAGE QUALIFYING COURSES
30
ENGLISH (HIGHER)
Alan McConnell Duff, Tiger's Eye (Oxford : Oxford University Press, 1998)
The objectives of this course are:
1. to expose the students to an extended prose text which is plot-driven
and addressed to second language learners
2. to learn the skills of English in the workplace and the word around us
3. to teach writing skills such as comprehension, exposition, summary
making etc.
4. enrich the students’ vocabulary
ENGLISH (LOWER)
A Foundation English Course for Undergraduates. Book II (Delhi :
Publication Division University of Delhi. 1992).
Note : Sections 7, 8, 17, 18, and 19 of this textbook will not be taught for
this course.
The objectives of this course are:
1. to expose the students to a variety of both literary and non-literary
genres (such as poster, advertisements and dialogues) which they
are likely to encounter in daily life
2. to teach reading skills such as scanning, identifying the main ideas,
and locating specific information
3. to teach writing skills such as narrating past and present events,
describing, summarizing, writing applications and filling forms
4. to enrich the students’ vocabulary
The teaching of the grammatical items has been interwoven in the units to
bring home to the students not only their syntactic structure but the context
in which they are more likely to occur. The two parts of the book, the
Reader and the Workbook, are designed to be taught simultaneously as
what is taught in the Reader is reinforced in the Workbook.
31
HINDI (HIGHER)
¼mu fo|kfFkZ;ksa ds fy, ftUgksaus nloha d{kk rd fgUnh i<+h gS½
I- vk/kqfud dky esa fgUnh Hkk"kk dk HkkSxkSfyd&foLrkj vad&15@15 ihfj;M
¼d½ vkt+knh ls igys fgUnh Hkk"kk dk ekufp=
¼[k½ jk"Vªh; vkUnksyu esa fgUnh dh Hkwfedk
¼x½ vkt+knh ds ckn fgUnh dk Lo:i vkSj foLrkj
¼jk"VªHkk"kk] jktHkk"kk] laidZ Hkk"kk ,oa ekud Hkk"kk ds :i esa½
II- lapkj ek/;eksa esa fgUnh ds fofo/k :i vad&15@15 ihfj;M
1- lapkj ek/;e dh vo/kkj.kk
2- fizaV ehfM;k esa fgUnh Hkk"kk ds fofo/k :i
(i) lekpkj ds fofo/k :i vkSj mudh Hkk"kk
(ii) Qhpj dh Hkk"kk
(iii) lEikndh; Hkk"kk
3- bySDVªkWfud ehfM;k esa fgUnh Hkk"kk ds fofo/k :i
(i) lekpkj dh Hkk"kk
(ii) euksjatu dh Hkk"kk jsfM;ks ,oa Vsyhfotu ds lanHkZ esa
(iii) foKkiu dh Hkk"kk
III- dk;kZy;h fgUnh % dk;kZy;h i= ys[ku ¼ljdkjh vkSj O;kolkf;d½] vkosnu] Loao`Ùk
ys[ku ¼ck;ks MkVk½] fVIi.k] izk:i.k] ikfjHkkf"kd 'kCnkoyh] iz'kklfud iz;qfDr;k¡]
eqgkojs@yksdksfDr;k¡ ¼vaxzsth ls fgUnh½
ikfjHkkf"kd 'kCnkoyh ¼lwph½ vad&10@10 ihfj;M
1. Audience
2. Audio-Visual Display
3. Audition
4. Authentic
5. Authority
6. Autograph
7. Autonomous
8. Awareness
9. Bearer
10. Bonafide
11. Bureaucracy
12. Bye-law
13. Capital
32
14. Cash sheet
15. Charge
16. Circular
17. Class-struggle
18. Clearing
19. Cognition
20. Commission
21. Compensation
22. Complex
23. Confirmation
24. Contract
25. Currency
26. Current Acount
27. Depositor
28. Diagnosis
29. Dialectics
30. Direction
31. Discretion
32. Dispatcher
33. Dividend
34. Editorial
35. Empire
36. Enclosure
37. Endorsement
38. Enforcement
39. Epistemology
40. Feudalism
41. Finance
42. Fiscal year
43. Globalisation
44. Good will
45. Guaranty
46. Honorarium
47. Idea
48. Image
49. Identity
50. Infrastructure
33
vaxzsth eqgkojksa vkSj yksdksfDr;ksa ds fgUnh izfr:i
1. A bone of contention
2. Apple of one's eye
3. Beggars must/should not be choosers
4. Between the devil and deep sea
5. Birds of a feather flock together
6. Brain drain
7. Easy come easy go
8. Empty vassels make much noise
9. Handsome is that handsome does
10. Hold the candle to the sun
11. Hold your mouth
12. Mind one's own business
13. Once in a blue moon
14. Out of frying pan into the fire
15. Pull one's leg
16. Thrown on one's back
17. To Beat about the bush
18. To blow hot and cold
19. To clear the air
20. To do one's level best
21. To freeze out
22. To look blank
23. To take the words out of mouth
24. To walk on air
25. Where there is a will there is a way
v- vaxzsth dh iz'kklfud vfHkO;fDr;ksa ds fganh izfr:i
1. Accepted for payment
2. Action has already been taken in the matter
3. Action may be taken as proposed
4. Application may be rejected
5. As per details below
6. Call for an explanation
7. Carried forward
8. Charge handed over
9. Seen, thanks
34
10. Seen and returned
11. For information only
12. Submitted for orders
13. Kindly acknowledge
14. Needful has been done
15. The proposal is self - explanatory
16. No further action is called for
17. This may please be treated as urgent
18. The pepers are sent herewith
19. Seen and returned with thanks
20. Delay in returning the file is regretted
21. The matter is still under consideration
22. No decision has so far been taken in the matter
23. We have no remarks to offer
24. The proposal is quite in order
25. Administrative approval may be obtained
26. Please speak
27. Please discuss
28. Issue reminder urgently
29. I agree
30. Draft approved as amended
31. Please make a special note of this decision
32. We are competent to grant permission
33. A draft sanction letter is put up for approval
IV. iYYkou] la{ksi.k] fuca/k ys[ku vad&10@10 ihfj;M
lgk;d xzaFk
1- fgUnh Hkk"kk dk bfrgkl & /khjsUnz oekZ
2- fgUnh Hkk"kk % lajpuk ds fofo/k vk;ke & johUnzukFk JhokLRko
3- fgUnh Hkk"kk dk bfrgkl & HkksykukFk frokjh
4- fgUnh Hkk"kk & vrhr ls vkt rd & fot; vxzoky
5- Hkkjr dh Hkk"kk,¡ & jktey cksjk
6- O;kogkfjd fgUnh vkSj jpuk & d`".kdqekj xksLokeh
7- O;kogkfjd fgUnh & johUnzukFk JhokLro@HkksykukFk
frokjh
8- iz'kklfud fgUnh&fuiq.krk & gfjckcw daly
35
9- iz;kstuewyd fganh % lajpuk vkSj vuqiz;ksx % MkWå jkeizdk'k] MkWå fnus'k dqekj xqIr
10- dFkk iVdFkk & eUuw Hk.Mkjh
11- iVdFkk ys[ku & euksgj';ke tks'kh
12- Qhpj ys[ku dk Lo:i & la- jke'kj.k tks'kh
13- jsfM;ks okrkZ f'kYi & fl)ukFk dqekj
14- jsfM;ks izlkj.k & dkS'ky 'kekZ
15- Vhåohå VkbEl & lq/kh'k ipkSjh
16- jsfM;ks vkSj nwjn'kZu i=dkfjrk & gfjeksgu
17- iVdFkk ys[ku % Qhpj fQYe & mes'k jkBkSj
18- HkweaMyhdj.k vkSj ehfM;k % dqeqn 'kekZ
36
HINDI (LOWER)
¼mu fo|kfFkZ;ksa us ftUgksaus dsoy vkBoha d{kk rd fgUnh i<+h gSa½
1- fgUnh Hkk"kk % lkekU; ifjp; vad 15@15 ihfj;M
¼d½ fgUnh dk HkkSxksfyd foLrkj
¼[k½ Hkk"kk vkSj cksyh % Lo:i vkSj varj
¼x½ fgUnh orZuh % ekud :i
2- fgUnh dk 'kCn&Hk.Mkj vkSj 'kCn&jpuk vad 10@10 ihfj;M
¼d½ laKk] loZuke] fo'ks"k.k] fØ;k
¼[k½ i;kZ; vkSj foykse
¼x½ v'kqf)&'kks/ku
¼?k½ eqgkojs vkSj yksdksfDr;k¡
3- iYYkou vFkok vuqPNsn ys[ku vad 5@5 ihfj;M
4- fuca/k&ys[ku vad 10@10 ihfj;M
izR;{k vuqHko ls tqM+s fofo/k i{kksa ¼?kVuk] n`';]
i;ZVu] [ksydwn½ ij vk/kkfjr
5- i= ys[ku vad 10@10 ihfj;M
¼d½ ekrk&firk vFkok fe= ds fy, i=
Nk=&thou ds vuqHko ds lanHkZ esa
¼[k½ lekpkj i= ds laiknd dks i=
vius {ks= dh fdlh leL;k ds fo"k; esa
¼x½ iz/kkukpk;Z dks i=
Nk=o`fÙk] vodk'k rFkk Nk=&thou ls tqM+h leL;kvksa ds ckjs esa
lgk;d xzaFk
1- csfld xzkej vkWQ fgUnh ¼dsUnh; fgUnh funs'kky;½
2- Spoken Hindi : Fair Banks & G.B. Mishra
3- fgUnh Hkk"kk % gjnso ckgjh
4- fgUnh dk lelkef;d O;kdj.k % ;equk dkp:
5- fgUnh O;kdj.k ¼,u-lh-bZ-vkj-Vh-½
37
URDU (HIGHER)
Unit-1 Jadeed Urdu Nasr 10 Marks/15 Lectures
(a) Sir Syed Ahmad Khan (Guzra Hua Zamana, Suraab-e-
Hayaat)
(b) Mohammad Hussain Azad (Insaan Kisi Haal Mein Khush
Nahein Rahta, Sach Aur Jhoot Ka Razm Naama)
Unit -2 Azaadi Ke Baad Urdu Shairi 10 Marks / 15 Lectures
(a) Urdu Ghazal
Firaq Gorakhpuri (Ghazal No.1,2,4,6,7)
Majrooh Sultanpuri (Ghazal No. 1,2,3,4,5)
Nasir Kazmi (Ghazal No.1,2,3,4,7)
(b) Urdu Nazm
Noon Meem Rashid (Rukhsat, Bekaraan Raat Ke
Sannate Mein) Akhtarul Iman (Qabr, Yaadein)
Makhdoom Mohiuddin (Intezaar, Chand Taron Ka Ban)
Unit -3 Azadi Ke Baad Urdu Fiction 10 Marks / 15 Lectures
(a) Ek Chadar Maili Si (Rajender Singh Bedi)
(b) Chotein (Ismat Chugtai) First Five Short-Stories
Unit-4 Essay and Translation 8 Marks / 15 Lectures
Recommended Books
(1) Mazameen-e-Sir Syed, Pub. Maktaba Jamia Ltd., Delhi.
(2) Nairang-e-Khayal, Pub. Maktaba Jamia Ltd., Delhi.
(3) Muntakhib Ghazaliyat, Edited by Dr. Ibne Kanwal, Pub. Kitabi Duniya,
Delhi.
(4) Muntakhib Nazmein, Edited by Dr. Ibne Kanwal, Pub. Kitabi Duniya, Delhi.
(5) Sir Syed Aur Unke Nanwar Rufaqa, by Syed Abdullah, Pub.
Educational Book House, Aligarh.
(6) Taareekh-e-Adab-e-Urdu, by Syed Ejaz Hussain & Syed Aquil Rizvi,
Pub. Educational Book House, Aligarh.
(7) Taraqqui Pasand Adab, by Khalilur Rahman Azmi, Pub. Educational
Book House, Aligarh.
*Attendance (2) Home Examinations (5) Assignment (5) = 12 Marks
38
URDU (LOWER)
Unit-1 Urdu Abad Ka Mukhtasar Tanuf 12 Marks / 15 Lectures
Prescribed Book : Urdu Ki Kahani By Syed Ehtisham Husain
Publisher : N.C.P.U.L., New Delhi
Following Topics :
(a) Urdu Zaban Ka Irtiqa
(b) Dilli Aur Lucknow Ki Shairi
(c) Naya Zamana - Naya Adab
Unit -2 Urdu Nazm 12 Marks / 15 Lectures
Prescribed Book: Muntakhib Nazmein
Published by Uttar Pradesh Urdu Academy, Lucknow
Following Poems:
(1) Muflisi (Nazeer Akbarabadi)
(2) Qata: Farzi Latifa (Akbar Allahabadi)
(3) Naqqad (Josh Malihabadi)
(4) Aye Ishq Kahin Ley Chal (Akhtar Shirani)
(5) Taj Mahal (Sahir Ludhyanvi)
Unit-3 Urdu Nasr (i) 14 Marks / 15 Lectures
Prescribed Book: Urdu Ke Shaahkar Afsane Ed. Sadique
Modern Publishing House, New Delhi
Following Afsane:
(a) Kafan: Prem Chand
(b) Tobatek Singh: Sadat Hasan Manto
(c) Adhe Ghante Ka Khuda: Krishn Chander
(d) Garam Coat: Rajinder Singh Bedi
(e) Peetal Ka Ghanta: Qazi Abdus Sattar
Recommended Books
(1) Urdu Adab Ki Tanqeedi Tareekh, By Syed Ehtisham Husain, Pub.
N.C.P.U.L., New Delhi.
(2) Tareekh-e-Adab-e-Urdu, By Noorul Hasan Naqvi, Pub. Educational
Book House, Aligarh
39
(3) Aaj Ka Urdu Adab, By Abulleis Siddiqui, Pub. Educational Book
House, Aligarh.
(4) Azadi Ke Bad Urdu Fiction, Ed. Abul Kalam Qasmi, Pub. Sahitya
Academy, New Delhi.
(5) Urdu Shairi Ka Fanni Irtiqa, By Farman Fatehpuri, Pub. Educational
Publishing House, Delhi.
(6) Urdu Nasr Ka Fanni Irtiqa, By Farman Fatehpuri, Pub. Educational
Publishing House, Delhi.
*Attendance (2) Home Examinations (5) Assignment (5) = 12 Marks
40
BENGALI
(a) Short Stories Collection - 15 marks
'Galpagucchha' (Pratham Khanda)
by Rabindranath Tagore
The following short stories are being recommended :
Samapti
Post Master
Jibito O Mrito
Madhyabortini
Kabuliwala
(b) A modern play - 15 marks
Ballavpurer Rupkatha by Badal Sirkar
(c) A short essay on a current topic - 8 marks
[There will be five questions in total. The students will be required to
answer 2 questions from the five short stories, 2 questions from the play.
The essay will on a current topic.)
41
MARATHI
(a) Five short stories from an Anthology - 15 marks
Athology : Saha Kathakar Ed.
Bhalchandra Phadke Continental
Prakashan, Pune
Short-Stories to be studied :
1. Kidaleli Manase by Gangadhar Gadgil
2. Shala by Vyankatesh Madgulkar
3. Natak by Shankar Patil
4. Radhi by G.A. Kulkarni
5. Bhook by Baburao Bagul
(b) A modern play - 15 marks
Safar by Vijay Tendulkar Popular
Prakashan, Mumbai
(c) A short essay on a current topic - 8 marks
[There will be five questions in total. The students will be required to
answer 2 questions from the five shrot stories, 2 questions from the play.
The essay will on a current topic.]
42
TAMIL
(a) Short Stories Collection - 15 marks
Aimbathandu Tamil eirukathaikal
(first five stories)
Ed. S. Kandasamy Kavitha
Publications T. Nagar, Chennai
Year : 2000 (F.E.)
(b) A modern play - 15 marks
Panivaal by Velu Saravanan
Tharkkala Tamil Nadakangal Ed.
Veli Rangarajan Kaavya Trust
Puram, Chennai Year : 1988 (F.E.)
(c) A short essay on a current topic - 8 marks
[There will be five questions in total. The students will be required to
answer 2 questions from the five short stories, 2 questions from the play.
The essay will on a current topic.]
43
TELUGU
(a) Short Stories Collection -- 15 marks
1. Devuni Jeevitham -- Gopichand
2. Yagnam -- Kalipatnam Ramarao
3. Vadina Pushpam -- Buchhi Babu
4. Muga Jeevulu -- Gokhale
5. Tea Kappulo Thuphanu -- Mokkapati Narasimha Rao
Available at : Telugu Department, S.V. College, New Delhi
(b) A modern play -- 15 marks
Vilunama by D.V. Narasaraju,
Srikanth Publications, Vijayawads
(c) A short essay on a current topic -- 8 marks
[There will be five questions in total. The students will be required to
answer 2 questions from the five short stories, 2 questions from the play.
The essay will on a current topic .]
44
ASSAMESE
(a) Short Stories Collection -- 15 marks
Assamiya Galpa Sankalan, published by Publication Board, Guwahati.
The following short stories are recommended. Only following writers
are prescribed :
1. Syed Abdul Mallik
2. Bhabendra Nath Saikia
3. Mahim Bora
4. Nagendra Narayan Chaudhury
(b) A modern play -- 15 marks
Bagh by Hemendra Barthakur
(c) A short essay on a current topic -- 8 marks.
[There will be five questions in total. The students will be required answer
2 questions from the five stories, 2 questions from the play. The essay will
on a current topic.]
45
SANSKRIT
Time 2 hrs. per week
1- uhfr'krde~ ¼HkrZ`gfj½ & 1 ls 50 'yksd rd
¼lanHkZ] vFkZ] O;k[;k½
2- Jhen~Hkxon~xhrk& }kn'k v/;k; ¼HkfDr;ksx½
3- laLd`r O;kdj.k &
1- Loj lfU/k ¼lfU/k] lfU/kfoPNsn] v'kqf);ksa dk la'kks/ku½
2- y?kq fucU/k
3- vuqokn ¼ljy½
lgk;d&xzUFk&lwph %&
1- uhfr'krde~
2- Jhen~Hkxon~xhrk] fgUnh vuqoknlfgr xhrk izsl xksj[kiqj
3- vuqoknpfUnzdk pØ/kj ukSfV;ky
4- gk;j laLd`r xzkej ¼fgUnh vuqokn½ ,e- vkj- dkys
5- laLd`r lkfgR; dk bfrgkl dfiynso f}osnh
6- laLd`r lkfgR; dk bfrgkl cynso mik/;k;
7- laLd`r lkfgR; dh :ijs[kk pUns'ks[kj ik.Ms; ,oa
O;kl
46
IN LIEU OF COMPULSORY LANGUAGE COURSE
47
ENGLISH
'The Individual and Society'
Concept Note
This course makes the assumption that literature is an important
and relevant way of making sense of the world we live in, though
literature employs myth, metaphor, fictional characters, irony, rhyme,
and other devices of language that might not be seen as legitimate in
more ‘scientific’ subjects. By these means, literature can, for
example, enable the reader to identify temporarily with people from
other cultures and backgrounds, and offer an ‘experience’ of being
a Dalit boy rejected by a school (Valmiki’s ‘Jhootan’), or a Black
African rejected as a tenant by a white landlady (Soyinka’s
‘Telephone Conversation’) - and an opportunity to compare the two.
Discussion of one text in the light of other texts is an important part
of this course. For example, several of the chosen texts vividly
illustrate the socialization of the girl child into roles acceptable to a
patriarchal society and show this same phenomenon occurring in
widely different cultures—inviting revealing comparisons. At least
two pieces use poetic language and irony in very quiet ways to make
a devastating criticism of the unnaturalness of war. We expect
students to discuss how the use of language and choice of genre
affect the writer’s meaning and the reader’s response.
We deliberately chose texts from widely different backgrounds
precisely because we wanted the student to appreciate the ways in which
his or her situation is comparable or analogous to the experiences of other
races, classes or nationalities. We also strongly felt that though our students
are Indian, they cannot possibly be untouched by western and other cultural
influences, and since we live in the so-called ‘global village’ the essays and
stories selected should reflect that reality. We have chosen 29 writers in all
in this paper and 13 of them are from the Indian subcontinent. Nearly all
are twentieth century authors as their themes and experiences are closer
to the students’ world.
The course comprises fictional writing, essays of different types and
styles, and poems. It is arranged according to themes that we thought would
48
not only be of interest and relevance to students but would be similar to
those likely to appear in the new courses of other disciplines. But where a
Sociology or Political Science course would handle ‘Gender,’ or ‘Race,’
etc, according to the specific approaches of those disciplines, our course
would bring these concepts to life for the student by literary means and
thus reinforce and deepen the impact of the other courses he or she may
be studying.
The Course
The course will consist of an anthology, The Individual and Society,
comprising a wide selection of poems, short stories and prose pieces. These
have been grouped under four broad themes : Caste/Classs; Gender;
Race and Violence and War. Readings will comprise 110 - 120 pages.
The anthology, including the readings, head notes, and annotations, will be
produced by the Department of English.
Section 1 Theme : Caste/Class 10 marks
B.R. Ambedkar 'Who were the Shudras?' Essay
Jotirao Phule Caste laws Essay (Extract)
Valmiki Jhootan Narrative Essay
Premchand Deliverance Shrot Story
Ismat Chugtai Kallu Short Story
Hira Bansode Bosom Friend Poem
Section 2 Theme: Gender 9 marks
Virginia Woolf Shakespeare’s Sister Essay
Rabindranath Tagore The Exercise Book Short Story
Jamaica Kincaid Girl Prose Monologue
Marge Piercy Breaking Out Poem
W B Yeats A Prayer for My Daughter Poem
Eunice D’Souza Marriages are made Poem
Ambai Yellow Fish Short Story
Margaret Atwood Reincarnation of Captain
Cook Poem
A K Ramanujan Highway Stripper Poem
Section 3 Theme: Race 9 marks
Roger Mais Blackout Short Story
49
Wole Soyinka Telephone Conversation Poem
Maya Angelou Still I Rise Poem
Nadine Gordimer Jump Short Story
Langston Hughes Harlem Poem
Section 4 Theme: Violence and War 10 marks
Siegfried Sassoon Return from the Somme Prose description
Wilfred Owen Dulce et Decorum Est Poem
Edna St Vincent Millay Conscientious Objector Poem
Henry Reed The Naming of Parts Poem
Bertolt Brecht General that Tank... Poem
Imtiaz Hussain A Chronicle of the
Peacocks Essay
Manto The Dog of Tetwal Short Story
Amitav Ghosh Ghosts of Mrs Gandhi Anecdotal Essay
50
fgUnh Hkk"kk] lkfgR; vkSj laLd`fr
1- Hkk"kk %& Hkk"kk dk egRo vad 15@15 ihfj;M
& Hkk"kk ds izdk;Z % ¼d½ oDrk&Jksrk&lans'k] ¼[k½ Lofue foKku] O;kdj.k]
vFkZfoKku
Hkk"kk vkSj lekt %
& Hkk"kk vkSj oxZ
& Hkk"kk vkSj fyax cks/k
& Hkk"kk vkSj tkrh;rk
& Hkk"kk vkSj vfLerk ds iz'u
fgUnh Hkk"kk %
& laf{kIr fodkl&ifjp;
& fgUnh dh cksfy;k¡
& Hkk"kk&uhfr dk fodkl % & fczfV'k dky eas Hkk"kk&uhfr
& jk"Vªh; vkanksyu vkSj Hkk"kk
& laoS/kkfud O;oLFkk
¼laidZHkk"kk] jkTkHkk"kk] jk"VªHkk"kk½
& cgqHkkf"kdrk vad 20@20 ihfj;M
2- Hkk"kk vkSj lkfgR; %
&ekSf[kd ,oa fyf[kr fgUnh lkfgR;
&izkphu Hkk"kk vkSj fgUnh lkfgR; ¼laLd`r] ikfy] viHkza'k½
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ifjp;kRed½
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3- laLd`fr vkSj ledkyhu lekt %
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& ikWiqyj dYpj dh vo/kkj.kk vkSj :i
& Hkkjrh; laLd`fr % ewY; cks/k
laLd`fr vkSj ehfM;k
51
& fgUnh i=&if=dkvksa ds bfro`Ùk dk ifjp;
&jsfM;ks] flusek] Vsyhfotu] baVjuSV
&foKkiu vkSj miHkksDrk&laLd`fr
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uksV % ;g ikB~; Øe ifjp;kRed] vo/kkj.kkcks/kd vkSj U;wure lwpuk ewyd
jgsxkA
lgk;d xazFk
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2- ewY;&ehekalk % xksfoUn panz ikaMs
3- fgUnh Hkk"kk vkSj mldh cksfy;k¡ % foeys'k dkafr oekZ
4- laLd`fr ds pkj v/;k; % jke/kkjh flag fnudj
5- jk"VªHkk"kk dh leL;k,¡ vkSj lek/kku % nsosUnzukFk 'kekZ
6- fgUnh Hkk"kk % lajpuk ds fofo/k vk;ke % johUnz ukFk JhokLro
7- ikWiqyj dYpj % lq/kh'k ipkSjh
8- nwjn'kZu % n'kk vkSj fn'kk % lq/kh'k ipkSjh
9- foKkiu dh nqfu;k % dqeqn 'kekZ
10- flus&fl)kar % vuqie
11- fgUnh i=dkfjrk vkSj lkfgR; % {kek 'kekZ
12- jsfM;ks vkSj nwjn'kZu i=dkfjrk % gfjeksgu
13- nfyr lkfgR; dh leL;k,¡ % rst flag
52
INTER-DISCIPLINARY COURSES
53
ETHICS IN THE PUBLIC DOMAIN
This is a general course designed to introduce students to some
central ethical issues of public policy and public debate. This course
will touch upon questions of moral agency, freedom and moral
commitment in both personal and public life. The broad themes within
the course, touch on different aspects of everyday life that students
are exposed to. It thus attempts to raise questions relevant to their
self-understanding as moral agents. It is designed to sharpen this
understanding and provide them with some conceptual tools to grapple
with the complexities of the modern world.
COURSE CONTENT
1. What is Ethics ? : Subjectivism, Relativism, Good, Moral Standards :
Prescribed Text :
Bernard Williams : Morality : An introduction to Ethics, Harper
and Row, London, 1972
2. Family, Marriage and Dowry
Prescribed Texts :
Patricia Oberoi : 'Family, Kinship, and Marriage in India, Student's
Enclyopedia, New Delhi-2000 (pp. 145-55)
Simone de Beauvoir, Second Sex (Part V chapter 1 : The Married
Woman)
James Rachels, 'Morality, Parents and Children, 'in Ethics in
Practice, ed. Huge Lafollette, Blackwell, 2002 (pp 167-178)
3. Structures of Inequality : Caste, Hunger, Poverty
Prescribed Texts :
B.R. Ambedkar 'Caste in India' (from Writings and Speeches Vol.
3. Bombay, 1987 (pp 99-111)
Amartya Sen Inequality Reexamined, Oxford 1992 (Chapters 4
& 7) Peter Singer 'Famine, Affluence and Morality,' (in Ethics in
Practice, pp. 572-581)
4. Media and Ethics : Agency, Privacy Censorship
Prescribed Texts :
54
Herbert Dreyfuss 'Nihilism on the information highway' (in On
The Internet by Herbert Dreyfuss Routledge 2001 (pp. 73-87)
David Archard 'Privacy, the public interest and a prurient
public' (in Media Ethics ed. Mathew Kieran, Routledge 1998 (pp
82-94) Ann Garry 'Sex, Lies and Pornography,' (in Ethics in
Practice, (pp. 344-355)
5. Secularism and Tolerance
Prescribed Text :-
T.N. Madan, Modern Myths, Locked Minds, Oxford University
Press 1997, Chapters 1, 8.
55
ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IN INDIA
This course has the following objectives
* To introduce the student to pressing issues in environment;
* To familiarise the student with the history of environmental issues in
India;
* To throw light on some of the dilemmas and problems in environmental
debates
Course Content
1. The Importance of Environment
2. Geography, ecology and cultures in Pre-Colonial India
Land, Forests, Water, Pastures, Ecology of Hills and Mountains
3. Colonialism and Developments in the Environment
New Regimes of Land, Forests Water and Irrigation
Resistance : Peasants, Tribals, and Pastoralists
4. Environmental Issues in Independent India
Forests, Dams, Displacement, Pollution Degradation
5. Environmental Movements in Independent India
Forests, Dams, Displacements, Pollution
6. Environmental Concerns in a Globalising World.
Suggested Readings
* Anil Aggarwal et al, 1985, The State of India's Environment : The
Second Citizen's Report, Delhi.
* 1992, The State of India's Environment : A Civizen's Report, Delhi.
* Madhav Gadgil and Ramchandra Guha, 1999, This Fissured Land,
An Ecological History of India, Delhi, OUP, second edition.
* Madhav Gadgil and Ramchandra Guha, 1995, Ecology and Equity,
The use and abuse of nature in Contemporary India, Delhi, Penguin.
* David Arnold and Ramchandra Guha, 1995, Eds, Nature, Culture,
Imperialism, Delhi, OUP, selected chapters.
* Salim Ali, 1985, The Fall of a Sparrow, Delhi, O.U.P.
56
READING GANDHI
The course seeks to meet two essential objectives : one, to acquaint
the students with the art of reading texts, to enable students to grasp
its conceptual and argumentative structure and to help them acquire
the skills to locate the texts in a broader intellectual and social historical
context. Second, it aims to acquiant the students with the social and
political through of Gandhi. We focus on Gandhi for three reasons :
first, Gandhi is highly original; second, some of his texts have the requisite
argumentative structure; third, the availability of a wide range of critical
commentaries on his work. The themes in Gandhian thought that are
chosen for a close reading are particularly relevant to our times.
1. Ways to read a text:
a. Textual
b. Contextual
(a) Terence Ball, Reappraising Political Theory, Chapter I, OUP,
1995.
(b) "Meaning and Understanding in the History of Ideas: in Visions
of Politics, Quentin Skinner (ed.), Vol. I, CUP, Cambridge,
2002.
2. Gandhi in his own words : a close reading of Hindi Swaraj.
3. Commentaries on Hind Swaraj and Gandhian thought :
(a) "Introduction", M.K. Gandhi, Hind Swaraj and other writings
ed. A.J. Parel (1997).
(b) B.Parekh, Gandhi (1997), chs. 4("Satyagraha") and 5("The critique
of modernity").
c) D. Hardiman, Gandhi in his time and ours (2003), ch.4 ("An
alternative modernity".
4. Gandhi and modern India :
a. Nationalism.
b. Communal unity
c. Women's Question
d. Untouchability.
57
This component will contain the following selections from Gandhi's India
of my Dreams (compiled R.K. Prabhu) : "The meaning of Swaraj" (no. 2);
"In defence of Nationalism" (no.3); "India's cultural heritage" (no. 45);
"Regeneration of Indian women" (no. 54); "Women's education" (no. 55);
"Communal unity" (no. 59); "The curse of untouchability" (no. 61); "Religious
tolerance in India" (no. 62); and, "The problem of minorities" (no. 66)
58
ENGLISH
'The Individual and Society'
Concept Note
This course makes the assumption that literature is an important and
relevant way of making sense of the world we live in, though literature
employs myth, metaphor, fictional characters, irony, rhyme, and other devices
of language that might not be seen as legitimate in more ‘scientific’ subjects.
By these means, literature can, for example, enable the reader to identify
temporarily with people from other cultures and backgrounds, and offer an
‘experience’ of being a Dalit boy rejected by a school (Valmiki’s Jhootan’),
or a Black African rejected as a tenant by a white landlady (Soyinka’s
‘Telephone Conversation’) and an opportunity to compare the two.
Discussion of one text in the light of other texts is an important part of this
course. For example, several of the chosen texts vividly illustrate the
socialization of the girl child into roles acceptable to a patriarchal society
and show this same phenomenon occurring in widely different cultures—
inviting revealing comparisons. At least two pieces use poetic language
and irony in very quiet ways to make a devastating criticism of the
unnaturalness of war. We expect students to discuss how the use of language
and choice of genre affect the writer’s meaning and the reader's response.
We deliberately chose texts from widely different backgrounds
precisely because we wanted the student to appreciate the ways in which
his or her situation is comparable or analogous to the experiences of other
races, classes or nationalities. We also strongly felt that though our students
are Indian, they cannot possibly be untouched by western and other cultural
influences, and since we live in the so-called ‘global village’ the essays and
stories selected should reflect that reality. We have chosen 29 writers in all
in this paper and 13 of them are from the Indian subcontinent. Nearly all
are twentieth century authors as their themes and experiences are closer
to the students’ world.
The course comprises fictional writing, essays of different types and
styles, and poems. It is arranged according to themes that we thought would
not only be of interest and relevance to students but would be similar to
59
those likely to appear in the new courses of other disciplines. But where a
Sociology or Political Science course would handle ‘Gender,’ or ‘Race,’
etc, according to the specific approaches of those disciplines, our course
would bring these concepts to life for the student by literary means and
thus reinforce and deepen the impact of the other courses he or she may
be studying.
The Course
The course will consist of an anthology, The Individual and Society,
comprising a wide selection of poems, short stories and prose pieces. These
have been grouped under four broad themes : Caste/Class; Gender; Race
and Violence and War. Reading will comprise 110 - 120 pages. The
anthology, including the readings, head notes, and annotations, will be
produced by the Department of English.
Section 1 Theme : Caste/Class 10 marks
B.R. Ambedkar 'Who were the Shudras' Essay
Jotirao Phule Caste laws Essay (Extract)
Valmiki Jhootan Narrative Essay
Premchand Deliverance Short Story
Ismat Chugtai Kallu Short Story
Hira Bansode Bosom Friend Poem
Section 2 Theme : Gender 9 marks
Virginia Woolf Shakespeare's Sister Essay
Rabindranath Tagore The Exercise Book Short Story
Jamaica Kincaid Girl Prose Monologue
Marge Piercy Breaking Out Poem
W B Yeats A Prayer for My Daughter Poem
Eunice D' Souza Marriages are made Poem
Ambai Yellow Fish Short Story
Margaret Atwood Reincarnation of Captain
Cook Poem
A K Ramanujan Highway Sripper Poem
Section 3 Theme : Race 9 marks
Roger Mais Blackout Short Story
60
Wole Soyinka Telephone Conversation Poem
Maya Angelou Still I Rise Poem
Nadine Gordimer Jump Short Story
Langston Hughes Harlem Poem
Section 4 Theme : Violence and War 10 marks
Siegfried Sassoon Return from the Somme Prose description
Wilfred Owen Dulce et Decorum Est Poem
Edna St Vincent Millay Conscientious Objector Poem
Henry Reed The Naming of Parts Poem
Bertolt Brecht Genral that Tank... Poem
Imtiaz Hussain A Chronicle of the Peacocks Essay
Manto The Dog of Tetwal Short Story
Amitav Ghosh Ghosts of Mrs. Gandhi Anecdotal Essay
61
fgUnh
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1- Hkk"kk % & Hkk"kk dk egRo vad 15@15 ihfj;M
& Hkk"kk ds izdk;Z % ¼d½ oDrk&Jksrk&lans'k] ¼[k½ Lofue
foKku] O;kdj.k] vFkZfoKku
Hkk"kk vkSj lekt %
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& Hkk"kk vkSj fyaxcks/k
& Hkk"kk vkSj tkrh;rk
& Hkk"kk vkSj vfLerk ds iz'u
fgUnh Hkk"kk %
& laf{kIr fodkl&ifjp;
& fgUnh dh cksfy;k¡
& Hkk"kk&uhfr dk fodkl % & fczfV'k dky eas Hkk"kk&uhfr
& jk"Vªh; vkanksyu vkSj Hkk"kk
& laoS/kkfud O;oLFkk
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& cgqHkkf"kdrk
2- Hkk"kk vkSj lkfgR; % vad 20@20 ihfj;M
& ekSf[kd ,oa fyf[kr fganh lkfgR;
& izkphu Hkk"kk vkSj fganh lkfgR; ¼laLd`r] ikfy] viHkza'k½
& jk"Vªh; vkanksyu vkSj faganh lkfgR;
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& L=hoknh lkfgR;
& nfyr lkfgR;
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& fgUnh i=&if=dkvksa ds bfro`Ùk dk ifjp;
& jsfM;ks] flusek] Vsyhfotu] baVjuSV
62
& foKkiu vkSj miHkksDrk&laLd`fr
& HkweaMyhdj.k vkSj laLd`fr
uksV % ;g ikB~;Øe ifjp;kRed % vo/kkj.kkcks/kd vkSj U;wure lwpukewyd
jgsxkA
lgk;d xzaFk
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2- ewY;&ehekalk % xksfoUnpanz ikaMs
3- fgUnh Hkk"kk vkSj mldh cksfy;k¡ % foeys'k dkafr oekZ
4- laLd`fr ds pkj v/;k; % jke/kkjh flag fnudj
5- jk"VªHkk"kk dh leL;k,¡ vkSj lek/kku % nsosUnzukFk 'kekZ
6- fganh Hkk"kk % lajpuk ds fofo/k vk;ke % johUnzukFk JhokLro
7- ikWiqyj dYpj % lq/kh'k ipkSjh
8- nwjn'kZu % n'kk vkSj fn'kk % lq/kh'k ipkSjh
9- foKkiu dh nqfu;k % dqeqn 'kekZ
10- flus&fl)kUr % vuqie
11- fganh i=dkfjrk vkSj lfgR; % {kek 'kekZ
12- jsfM;ks vkSj nwjn'kZu i=dkfjrk % gfjeksgu
13- nfyr lkfgR; dh leL;k,¡ % rst flag
14- nfyr lkfgR; dh leL;k,¡ % 'kj.k dqekj
15- ifjf/k ij L=h % e`.kky ikaMs
16- mifuos'kokn eas L=h % izHkk [ksrku
17- laLd`fr fodkl vkSj lapkj Økafr % iwjupUn tks'kh
18- L=h ijk/khurk % tkWu LVqoVZ feYl ¼vuq-½
19- L=h misf{krk % lheksu n ckscqvkj ¼vuq-½
63
GENDER AND SOCIETY
Course Objectives
This course will introduce the student to basic concepts of gender and
convey a sense of the multiple relations of gender and society. A comparative
frame that cuts across disciplines as well as cultures is intrinsic to the
framework of the course and readings. Issues of private and public
articulations of gender are explored within the domestic domain as a context
for power as well as the larger domain of politics and social movements.
Expected Learning Outcomes
Students offering this course will be able to develop a perspective on gender
relations, gendered institutions and gender politics within a comparative
cultural frame to understand the dynamic and changing nature of gender
and society. Questions in the Annual Examination should cut across topics.
I. Social constructions of gender
a. Concepts of sex and gender
b. Dislocating gender identity
II. Everyday formations of gender
a. Divisions of work and property
b. Familial domain
III. Politics of gender
a. Gender and resistance
b. Sexual liberation movements
Readings :
1. Oakley, Ann, 1972. Sex, Gender and Society. London : Temple Smith.
2. Scott, Joan W., 1988. Gender and the Politics of History, New York:
Columbia University Press (Part I: Chapter 2).
3. Harre, Rom 1998. Contested constructions : Man and Woman. In
Donn Welton (Ed.) Body and Flesh: A Philosophical Reader. Pp.
11-27. Oxford : Blackwell.
4. Nanda, Serena, 1990. Neither man nor woman : The hijras of India.
Belmont: Wadsworth Publishing.
64
5. Cornwall, Andrea and Lindisfarne, Nancy (Eds.) 1994. Dislocating
masculinities: Comparative ethnographies (Chapter 1). London
and New York : Routledge.
6. Leacock, Eleanor, Safa, Helen, et al. (Eds) 1986. Women’s work:
Development and the division of labour (articles by Weiner pp. 96-
110, Afonja pp. 122-139, Lourdes and Arande 174-193) Massachusetts:
Bergin and Garvey Publishers.
7. Agarwal, Bina, 1998. “Who Sows? Who Reaps? Women and land
rights in India Journal of Peasant Studies. 15 (4): 531-581.
8. Papanek, Hanna 1990. To each less than she needs, From each more
than she can do: Allocations, entitlements and value. In Irene Tinker
(Ed.) Persistent Inequalities: Women and World Development. Pp.
162-181. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
9. Pineda, Javier, 2001. Partners in women headed households: Emerging
masculinities? In Cecile Jackson (Ed.) Men at work: Labour,
masculinities, development. Pp. 72-92. London: Frank Cass.
10. Jeffrey, Patricia, 1979/2000. Frogs in a well: Indian women in purdah.
Delhi: Manhohar .
11. De Pina Cabral, Joao, 1984. Female power and the inequality of wealth
and motherhood in Portugal. In Renee Hirschon (ed.) Women and
property, women as property. Pp. 75-90. London: Croom Helm.
12. Ray, Raka, 2000. Fields of Protest: Women’s movements in India.
New Delhi: Kali for Women.
13. Kumar, Radha, 1989. A history of doing: An illustrated account of
movement’s for women’s rights and feminism in India. New Delhi:
Kali for Women.
14. Radway, Janice, 1983. Women read the romance: The interaction
of text and context. Feminist Studies 8, (Spring) pp. 53-78.
15. Castells, Manuel: 1983. “Cultural identity, sexual liberation and urban
structure: the gay community in San Francisco” In The city and the
grassroots: A cross- cultural theory of urban movements. Pp 138-
170. Berkeley: University of California Press.
16. Millet, Kate, 1970. Sexual Politics New York: Doubleday.
65
MATHEMATICAL AWARENESS
Preamble
The above-mentioned course on Mathematica1 Awareness is designed to
create appreciation of the beauty and importance of mathematics in our
everyday lives. Care has been taken to gently yet purposefully introduce
the student to some central yet elementary aspects of mathematics. The
contents are to be taught with emphasis on the use of intuition, and history
rather than on rigour. Skills for visua1 interpretation shall be brought into
focus and yet some theoretica1 aspects with stress on enhancing numerica1
ability shall be deve1oped.
Mathematical Awareness
The aim of this course is to enhance mathematical ability and increase
awareness of mathematical developments, with a special relevance to the
real world. Keeping these objectives in view.
* the emphasis will be on an intuitive approach
* historical background relevant to each topic will be given and
* special emphasis will be on skill of visual interpretation and enhancing
numerical ability
The syllabus for this course is given below.
Unit I - Brief Biographical Sketches 6 marks
A brief introduction to the lives and information on the works of the following
Mathematicians:
Archimedes, Euclid, Pythagoras, Aryabhata, Bhaskaracharya II,
Brahmagupta, Madhavacharya, Neelkantha, Newton, Cauchy, Euler, Abel,
Galois, Gauss, Germain, Kovalyskaya, Noether, Riemann, Hilbert, Noether
and Ramanujan, Harish Chandra.
Of the above, biographies of Euclid, Newton, Noether, Ramanujan and
Riemann will be examined.
The biographies of the remaining mathematicians in the above list are
to be covered via projects for internal assessment.
66
Unit II - Numbers 12 marks
An overview of number systems, including algebraic and transcendental
numbers, with some historical background.
Divisibility of integers, The Euclidean algorithm, Modular Arithmetic and
some divisibility criteria. Magic squares.
Prime numbers, the sieve of Erastosthenes, the fundamental theorem of
arithmetic, Euclid’s Theorem. Mersenne Numbers and Mersenne Primes,
Goldbach Conjectures, Prime testing method of Fermat, Statement and
significance of The Prime number theorem. Uses of prime numbers, for
example in RSA.
Pythagorean triples, Statement and historic background of Fermat’s Last
Theorem. Fibonacci sequences in nature.
Multiplication Principle, Permutation and Combinations.
The emphasis will be on enhancing numerical ability through these
concepts.
Unit III - Graph Theory and Geometry 12 marks
Basics of Graph theory, the Konigsberg Bridge problem, Four-Colour map
theorem.
Introduction to functions, graphs of function. Increasing and decreasing
functions, even and odd functions, location of points of extrema, inflection,
periodic functions-all via graphs.
Perspective and Projection. Perspective geometry: lines and points in 2D
and 3D, Fundamental trigonometric functions. Use of perspective in drawing,
historical background. Common tools adopted by artists for such
representations. Analysis of some paintings to spot use of perspective and
techniques. Escher’s art.
Types of symmetry, concrete examples of symmetry groups, Basic tilings.
Study of symmetry and patterns by looking at monuments/buildings/
ornamental art.
Shapes and solids. The regular Polyhedra, Euler’s formula, Golden ratio,
Golden rectangle.
67
The importance of Platonic solids and mystical significance to the ancient
Greeks. Construction of Altars and geometry in ancient India.
Fractals in nature, for example snowflakes and coastlines.
The Mobius Strip and the Klein Bottle.
The emphasis while dealing with the above topics will be on enhancing
skills of visual perception and interpretation.
Unit IV - Statistical and Related Concepts 8
marks
Histograms, pie charts, tabular forms and ogives. Mean, Median, Mode,
Variance, and Standard Deviation. Data analysis, interpretation and
prediction.
Classical approach to probability, the addition and multiplication laws of
probability.
Solutions of linear inequalities using graphs. Historical development of
operations research.
Use of computer based spreadsheets for simple statistical analysis.
Project work for internal assessment
12 marks
Projects based on one of the following:
1. Data analysis, interpretation and prediction using an appropriate
computing tool.
2. The biographies of the mathematicians listed above. (Excluding the
five that are examinable)
Texts
* Gulberg, Jan, Mathematics: from the birth of numbers, W. W.
Norton and Company, New York & London, 1996.
* loan, James, Remarkable Mathematicians, Cambridge University
Press, 2004.
* Salkind, Neil J., Statistics for people who (think they) hate
Statistics, Sage Publications, Inc.2000.
68
Supplements
* Bibhutibhusan Datta, Ancient Hindu Geometry: The Science of
the Sulbas, Calcutta Univ. Press, 1932, Reprinted, Cosmo. Pub.,
New Delhi, 1993.
* Farmer, David, W., Groups and Symmetry: A Guide to
Discovering Mathematics, AMS 1996.
* Stillwell, John, Mathematics and its History, Springer-Verlag,
2002.
* Tattersall, James J., Elementary Number Theory, Cambridge
University Press, 1999.
* Taha, Hamdy A., Operations Research: An Introduction, 5th
ed., Prentice Hall, 1995.
* Various issues of Ganita Bharati, the Bulletin of the Indian Society
for History of Mathematics.
* Website: www.math.iupui.edu/m290 (for Perspective and Art).
69
DISCIPLINE CENTRED COURSES
70
PSYCHOLOGY FOR LIVING
(for Non Psychology Students)
Preamble
This course addressed to the needs of the students who wish to study
Psychology as a means of providing an understanding of a person situated
in social context. Its aim is to introduce the general principles and approches
that psychologists use to understand behaviour. It also offers an
understanding of the expanding field, its relevance to problems and concerns
of every day life, and the strategies for a healthy life. It attempts to provide
the students up-to-date knowledge of the key concerns of psychology in
context of the Self. It enables the student to develop an understanding of
himself, his relationships, and his discordant behaviours. The syllabus
integrates the conceptual with the experiential by integrating short
experiential exercises along with the core concepts.
Theory
Unit 1: Self Direction in a Changing World : Social Change; The challenge
of Self Direction.
Marks : 5
Unit 2 : The Physical Self : The body and health; Body image;
Psychological factors and physical illness; Promoting wellbeing.
Marks : 5
Unit 3 : The Knowing Self : Cognitive Processes : Consciousness, learning,
memory, language, thinking & intelligence.
Marks : 6
Unit 4 : The Emotional Self : Understanding emotions; Expressing
emotions; Managing emotions.
Marks : 5
Unit 5 : Self in Relationships : Interpersonal relationships : Family, peer
group, culture.
Marks : 5
Unit 6 : Self in Disintegrative Experiences : Anxiety, stress and depression;
Understanding stress and coping with it.
Marks : 6
71
Unit 7 : Growth and Actualizing Self : Subjective well being in relation to
social world; Suffering and resilience; Hope; Happiness;
Compassion.
Marks : 6
Note : Each Unit will be supported by experiential exercises. These
exercises will be done in groups of 10-12 students for more
effective implementation.
Reference Texts
1. Atwater Eastwood (1995). Psychology for living : Adjustment,
growth and behaviour today. New Delhi : Prentice Hall.
2. Berk L.E. (2003). Development through the Lifespan. (3rd
Edition). Allyn & Bacon.
3. Burnard, C. (2002), Interpersonal skills training. New Delhi :
Viva Books Private Ltd.
4. Capacchione, L (2003) The well-being journal. India : Penguin
Books.
5. Carr. Alan (2004). Positive Psychology : The science of
happiness and human strength. New York : Brunner Routledge.
6. Kakar, S. (Ed.) (1979). Identity and adulthood. Delhi : Oxford
University Press Pg. 3-36.
7. Kolb, David A. (1984). Experiential learning : Experience as
the source of learning and development. Englewood Cliffs, N.J :
Prentice-Hall.
8. Lynn, A.B. (2002). The emotional intelligence activity book.
New York : AMACOM.
9. Mayer, J.D., Solovey, P., & Caruso, D.R. (2000). Models of
emotional intelligence. In R.J. Sternberg (Ed.) The handbook
of intelligence (pp. 396-420). New York : Cambridge University
Press.
10. Nelson-Jones, R. (1997). Practical counselling & Helping Skills.
4th ed. London/New York : Continuum.
72
Reference Readings
1. Seligman, Martin E.P., & Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly (2000).
Positive psychology : an introduction American Psychologist,
55, 5-14.
2. Smith, Donna M., & David A. Kolb. (1986). The user's guide
for the learning-style inventory: a manual for teachers and
trainers. Boston, MA : McBer & Company.
3. Sternberg R.J. (2001). In search of the human mind. New York
: Harcourt.
4. Wade, C. & Tavris, C. (2004) Invitation to psychology (3rd
Edition). New Jersy : Prentice-Hall.
5. Wallace, R.H. & Masters, A.L. (2001). Personal development
for life and work (8th edition). South-Western, Thomson
Learning.
6. Winnicott, D.W. (1971). Playing and reality. London : Tavistock
Publications Ltd. (Pg. 138-150)
7. Zimbardo, P.G. and Pusch, F.L. (1996) Psychology and life (15
Ed.). New-York : Harper Collins.
Internal Assessment 12 marks
Attendance : 2 marks
Presentation/Assignment/ : 10 marks
Home Examination/Experimental Exercise
Norms
2 Theory per week + 1 Tutorial (per group) fortnightly.
Tutorial group size 12-15
73
URDU LITERATURE
Time : 2 Hours (2 classes per week)
Unit-1 Urdu Zaban-o-Adab Ki Ibtida 10 Marks / 20 Lectures
Introduction of the following:
(1) Sanskrit Aur Prakrit Zabaanein
(2) Urdu Ki Ibtida Se Mutalliq Nazaryat
(3) Amir Khusrau Aur Hindvi Shairi
Unit-2 Urdu Sher-o-Adab 10 Marks / 20 Lectures
(1) Deccan Mein Urdu Sher-o-Adab Ka Irtiqa
Quli Qutab Shah - Mulla Wajhi, Nusrati, Wali Dakani, Siraj
Aurangabadi
(2) Sh u mali Hind Mein Urdu Sher-o-Adab-Ka I r t i qa
Meer, Nazeer Akbarabadi, Ghalib, Anees, Iqbal
Unit-3 Urdu Ka Afsanvi Adab 10 Marks / 10 Lectures
(1) Daastanien
(2) Novel
(3) Mukhtasar Afsana
Unit-4 Takhliqi Adab Ki Amali Mashq 8 Marks / 10 Lectures
1) Afsana Nigaari
2) Khaka Nigari
3) Reportage
Recommended Books
(1) Urdu Adab Ki Tanqeedi Tareekh, By Syed Ehtisham Husain, Pub.
N.C.P.U.L., New Delhi.
(2) Mayar-O-Meezan, By Masih Uzzaman, Allahabad.
(3) Amir Khusrau, By Waheed Mirza, Pub. National Amir Khusrau
Society, Delhi.
(4) Dakani Adab Ki Tareekh, By Mohioddin Qadri Zor, Pub. Educational
Book House, Aligarh.
(5) Dakan Mein Urdu, By Naseeruddin Hashmi, Pub. N.C.P.U.L., New
Delhi
(6) Tareekh-e-Adab-e-Urdu, By Noorul Hasan Naqvi, Pub. Educational
Book House, Aligarh.
74
(7) Dastan Se Afsane Tak, By Waqaar Azeem, Pub. Educational Book
House, Aligarh.
(8) Dastan Se Novel Tak, By Ibne Kanwal, Pub. Maktaba Jamia Ltd.,
Delhi.
(9) Biswin Sadi Mein Urdu Novel, By Yousuf Sarmast, Pub. N.C.P.U.L.,
New Delhi.
(10) Urdu Asnaf Ki Tadris, By Onkar Kaul, Pub. N.C.P.U.L., New Delhi.
(11) Fan-e-Afsana Nigari, By Waqaar Azeem, Pub. Educational Book
House, Aligarh.
(12) Adab Ka Mutalia, By Athar Parvez, Pub. Urdu Ghar, Aligarh.
(13) Urdu Mein Reportage Nigari, By Abdul Aziz, Pub. Saqi Book Depot,
Delhi.
(14) Urdu Reportage Tareekh-o-Tanqeed, By Talat Gul, Pub. Kitabi Duniya,
Delhi.
* Attendance (2) Home Examinations (5) Assignment (5) = 12 Marks
75
PERSIAN LITERATURE
1. Rubaiyat-e-Khayaym (First 25 Rubaiyat)
Ghazalyat-e-Hafiz
(next 5 from Naseb-e-Jaid-e-farsi)
Hikayat-e-Sa'di (from Chapter I & III)
Marks 8
2. Introduction of important Literary Personalities.
Hafiz Shrazi
Sa'di Shirazi
Firdausi
Umar Khayyam
Iraj Mirza
Parveen Etesami
Marks 8
3. Introduction of cultural background of Iran.
Jashn-e-Mehragan
Jashn-e-Sadeh
Jashn-e-Norooz
Jashn-e-Chahar shamb-e-suri
Marks 8
4. Introduction of Indo-Persian Historians
Abulfazl
Minhaj Siraj
Abdul Qadir Badauni
Marks 8
5. Grammar & Translation :
Verb (all the tenses)
Ism-e-Faail
Ism-e-Maful
Sifat Mosoof
Wahid-o-Jama
Morakkab-e-adadi
Tashbih
Iste'arah
Mozaf
Mozaf Elaih
Marks 8
6. Internal Assessment
Marks 10
76
fgUnh lkfgR;
(HINDI LITERATURE)
I fgUnh lkfgR; dk laf{kIr ifjp; vad&10@15 ihfj;M
¼v½ vkfndkyhu vkSj e/;dkyhu lkfgR; dk laf{kIr ifjp;
¼dkyfoHkktu ,oa ukedj.k dh leL;k ij fopkj½
¼c½ vk/kqfud dk vFkZ] e/;dkyhu cks/k vkSj vk/kqfud cks/k esa varj
¼l½ fgUnh lkfgR; esa uotkxj.k ,oa fodkl dh fn'kk
II fgUnh dfork vad&15@15 ihfj;M
1- HkkjrsUnq lexz & ¼izpkjd xzaFkkoyh ifj;kstuk½ u;s t+ekus dh eqdjh* izFke&10
2- lqHknzk dqekjh pkSgku & ckfydk dk ifjp;
3- izlkn & v'kksd dh fpark
4- fujkyk & dqdqjeqÙkk & I
5- cPpu & e/kq'kkyk & ikB~;va'k ¼46 ls 58½
6- fnudj & tura= dk tUe ¼gqadkj½
7- ukxktZqu & ik¡piwr
8- /kwfey & 'kkafrikB
9- nq";Ur & x+t+ysa & (i) dgk¡ rks r; Fkk fpjkxk¡ gjsd ?kj ds fy, A --
(ii) gks xbZ gS ihj ioZr&lh fi?kyuh pkfg, A-----
10- j?kqchj lgk; & vf/kuk;d
III fgUnh x| ¼fofo/k :i½ vad & 15@15 ihfj;M
1- xqysjh & mlus dgk Fkk
2- izsepUn & nw/k dk nke
3- Lo;a izdk'k & ikVhZ'ku
4- egknsoh oekZ & fcfc;k
5- gfj'kadj ijlkbZ & foKkiu esa fcdrh ukjh
6- Q.kh'oj ukFk ^js.kq* & iqjkuh dgkuh % u;k ikB
7- gtkjh izlkn f}osnh & ?kj tksM+us dh ek;k
IV nzqrikB vad & 10@5 ihfj;M
ukVd & Hkh"e lkguh % ek/koh vFkok Lons'k nhid % dksVZ ek'kZy
miU;kl & Jhyky 'kqDy % jkxnjckjh vFkok euksgj';ke tks'kh % dli
77
lgk;d xzaFk
1- fgUnh lkfgR; dk bfrgkl & jkepUnz 'kqDy
2- fgUnh lkfgR; dh Hkwfedk & gtkjhizlkn f}osnh
3- e/;dkyhu cks/k dk Lo:i & gtkjhizlkn f}osnh
4- fgUnh tkfr dk lkfgR; & jkefoykl 'kekZ
5- fujkyk dh lkfgR;&lk/kuk ¼Hkkx&2½ & jkefoykl 'kekZ
6- izsepUn vkSj mudk ;qx & jkefoykl 'kekZ
7- HkkjrsUnq gfj'pUnz & jkefoykl 'kekZ
8- HkkjrsUnq vkSj muds lg;ksxh dfo & fd'kksjhyky xqIr
9- izlkn dk dkO; & izse'kadj
10- nwljh ijaijk dh [kkst & ukeoj flag
11- 'kk¡frfudsru ls f'kokfyd rd & laik- f'koizlkn flag
12- ukxktqZu dh dfork & vt; frokjh
13- dV?kjs dk dfo % /kwfey&x.ks'k rqylhjke v"Vsdj
14- j?kqohj lgk; & laik- fo".kqukxj] vln t+Snh
15- vk/kqfud lkfgR; vkSj bfrgkl cks/k & fuR;kuan frokjh
16- ;qxpkj.k fnudj & lkfo=h flUgk
17- ns'k ds bl nkSj esa & fo'oukFk f=ikBh
18- egknsoh & laik- ijekuan JhokLro
19- l`tu'khyrk dk ladV & fuR;kuan frokjh
20- cPpu & d`".kpanz iaM~;k
21- vkR;dFkk % Lo:i vkSj fodkl & fouhrk vxzoky
22- fgUnh ukVd % feFkd vkSj ;FkkFkZ & jes'k xkSre
78
ENGLISH LITERATURE
I. Modern Indian Literature : 18 marks
Poems and Short Stories
(Delhi : Oxford University Press, 1999)
II. Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice 20 marks
Or
Bertolt Brecht, Mother Courage
Or
Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights
Or
E. M. Forster. A Passage to India
The aims of this course are to train the students to read and appreciate
various literary forms such as poetry, prose, novel and drama and to
write essays and short notes involving explanations and critical comments.
79
CULTURAL DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC PLURALITY AND
LITERARY TRADITION IN INDIA
Concept :
This course aims at introducing the student to some literary currents in the
contexts of cultural diversity and linguistic plurality of India. The objective
is to demonstrate the interface between language and culture and the
evolving of literary traditions from medieval times. With the help of selected
essays and creative writing in this area, the course will endeavour to show
that "Unity in diversity" is not a mere slogan but an idea that has emerged
out of the lived experience of the subcontinent over centuries. It finds its
expression in the multi-lingual consciousness of its people, something that
is completely lacking in the mono-lingual cultures of many Western nations.
When languages are politicized and polarized, an artificial insularity is
imposed, which then severely damages the very fabric of society. For
instance, the Sanskritization of Hindi or the Persianisation of Urdu over the
last 150 years has had alarming consequences, creating a crisis of identity
for many speakers of the languages. Sectarian politics can affect and
distort a whole way of life.
This course will provide a perspective to the students to comprehend the
complexity of the cultural context of our multilingual society. Such an
objective can be fulfilled through a close reading of some seminal essays
and selected creative writing that captures the varied nuances of living in
India.
Content
I. Extracts from the following essays : 14 Marks
1. Sisir Kumar Das. "The Mad Lover", from Indian Literature, no.
215, May-June 2003, pp. 149-178.
2. Rabindra Nath Tagore, "Baul Songs" (pp. 42-48), "The Bengali of
Mahtabs and Madarsas" (p. 358-360), Selected Writing on
Literature and Language, ed. Sukanta Chaudhuri, OUP, Delhi,
2001.
80
3. "The Origin and Development of Hindi/Hindavi,' from Amrit
Rai : A House Divided, OUP, 1984, pp. 285-289.
4. M.K. Naik, "Indian Pride and Indian Prejudice : Reflection on the
Relationship between Regional Indian Literatures and Indian
Writing in English", Indian Literature, New Delhi.
5. A. K. Ramanujan : "Towards a Countersystem : Women's Tales"
(pp. 29-447), The Collected Essays of A.K. Ramanujan, ed. Vinay
Dharwadker, Oxford India Paperbacks, 2004, pp. 96-114.
6. Ali Asani, "At teh Crossroads of Indic and Iranian Civilization' :
Sindhi Literary Culture. "Literary Cultures in History, ed. Sheldon
Pollock, OUP, 2003. pp.615-624. 627-639.
7. Sitanshu Yashaschandra, "From Hemacandra to Hind Swaraj',
Region and Power in Gujarati Literary Culture", Literary Cultures
in History, ed, Sheldon Pollock, OUP, 2003 (17 pages)
8. Eleanor Zelliot, "Dalit Sahitya, The Historical Background", An
Anthology of Dalit Literature, ed. Mulk Raj Anand and Eleanor
Zelliot, Gyan Publishing House, Delhi, 1992. pp. 1-19.
9. Sujit Mukherji : "Prospositions" from Some Position on a Literary
History of India. Central Institute of Indian Language, Mysore,
1981, pp. 43-53.
10. Nabneeta Deb Sen, "A Woman's Retelling of the Rama-Tale',
Narrative Strategies employed in the Chandrabati Ramayana",
Narrative: A Seminar, Sahitya Akademi, 1994, pp. 166-179.
11. G.N. Devy, Introduction, An Anthology of Tribal Literature,
Penguin Books, 2002, pp. IX-XVII.
II. Creative Writing : 24 Marks
1. 3 Poems in translation : Raghubir Sahai from Hindi ("Hindi");
Ayyappa Paniker from Malayalam; Padma Sachdev from Dogri
("Mother Tongue").
2. Short Story : Urdu story in translation by Rajinder Singh Bedi :
"Lajwanti".
81
3. 3 poems from Bhakti in translation : Kabir /Nanak/ Chaitanya and
A.K. Ramanujan's translation of vachanas.
4. A selection of Sufi poetry in translation : Amir Khusro/Baba Farid/
Bulle Shah
5. Iqbal "Qaumi Tarana'
6. 2 Dalit poems from No Entry for the New Sun, ed. Arjun Dangle,
Disha Books, Delhi, 1992.
7. "Songs of Birth and Death", A selection of tribal verse, from
G.N. Devy ed., Anthology of Tribal Literature, Penguin Books
2002, pp. 170-172.
8. An extract from Raja Rao's novel Kanthapura.
9. A story by U.R. Anantha Murthy.
Suggested Readings (For teachers and Interested students) :
Aijaz Ahmad, "Indian Literature : Notes towards the Definition of a
Category", In Theory, Classes, Nations, Literatures, OUP, India, 1992.
Vinay, Dharwadker, "Orientalism and the Study of Indian Literature",
Orientalism and the Pastcolonial Predicament, ed. Carol A.
Breckenridge & Peter Van Der Veer, OUP. Delhi, 1994.
Anjam Hasan, "The North-east : A Tale of Two Literatures", Indian
Review of Books, A............. Special, 16th Sept,.-15 Nov. 1995.
Jawaharlal Nehru. "The Variety and Unity of India', The Discovery of
India, OUP, 1940/1994. pp. 61-62, pp. 99-109.
Gopal Guru, "Dalits in pursuit of Modernity", India Another Millenium,
ed, Romila Thapar, Penguin India, 2000,.
Rustom Barucha, "Thanking Through Culture", India Another Millenium.
U.R. Anantha Murthy, "Tradition and Creativity", Govt. Sanskrit College
Committee, Tripurithura, 1994/Essay from A.J. Thomas's collection of
U.R. Anantha Murthy's prose writings.
E. Annamalai, "Language and the Indian Constitution", Language and
the State Perspectives on the Eighth Schedule, ed. R.S. Gupta, Anvita
82
Abbi, Kailash Aggarwal, Creative Books, New Delhi, (4 pages).
N.B. : Literature Honours students (English, Hindi, Sanskrit, any other
Indian Language) who are not required to take a compulsory
Language Credit Course may opt for either of these two courses.
These courses may be made available to other Honours students
as well.
The scheme of examinations will be as per the University
Ordinances.
83
PUNJABI LITERATURE
Pattern and Structure
1. The summary of the theme of any poem (One question is to be asked
out of two alternative questions). 8 marks
2. The theme or artistic peculiarities of the novelette (One question is to
be asked out of two alternative questions). 8 marks
3. The theme or artistic peculiarities of the travelogue (One question is to
be asked out of two alternative questions). 8 marks
4. The theme or artistic peculiarities of any one-act play (One question is
to be asked out of two alternative questions). 6 marks
5. History of Punjabi Literature (One question is to be asked out of two
alternative questions). 8 marks
6. Internal assessment 12 marks
Syllabus
1. Arshi, Gurcharan Singh (ed.), Kav-Lok, Arsee Publishers, Delhi.
2. Pritam, Amrita, Pinjar, Nagmani Prakashan, New Delhi.
3. Gargi, Balwant, Pataal di Dharti, Arsee Publishers, Delhi.
4. Attar Singh (ed.), Chonvan Ikangi Sangreh, Sahit Academy, Delhi.
5. Sital, Jit Singh, Punjabi Sahit da Itihas, Punjabi University, Patiala.
Recommended Books
1. Arshi Gurcharan Singh, Bawa Balwant di Kavya Kala, Arsee
Publishers, Delhi 1993.
2. _______, Sathi Samikhya, Arsee Publishers, Delhi 2001, "Kav-Sidhant',
pp. 45-53, 'Pritam Singh Safeer di Kavita', pp. 100-113.
3. ______, Novel di Sanrachna, National Book Shop, Delhi.
4. Behl, Navnindra (ed.), Rangmanch ate Television Natak, Punjabi
Academy, Delhi, 1989.
5. Cheema, Gurdip Kaur, Amrita Pritam de Novelan vich Manavi Rishte.
Lokait Prakashan, Chandigarh, 1983.
84
6. Harcharan Kaur (Dr.), Samikhya Sabhiachar, Sapt-Sindhu
Publications, Delhi, 1995.
7. Noor, Sutinder Singh, Navin Kavita : Seema te Sambhavana, Vadwan
Prakashan, Ambala Cant., 1972, 'Haribhajan Singh', pp. 70-77, 'Jaswant
Singh Neki', pp. 78-83, "Tara Singh", pp. 84-89, "S.S. Misha', pp. 90-94,
"Shiv Kumar", pp. 95-100, "Jagtar', pp. 101-105, 'Pash', pp. 118-122.
8. Punjabi Sahit Kosh, Part I, Punjabi University, Patiala, 1971, 'Ikangi',
pp. 127-129, Safarnama, pp. 145-147.
9. Rachhpal Kaur (Dr.), Punjabi Safarnama : Sarup te Sambhavana,
Vrijesh Prakashan Nabha, 1991, 'Safarnama : Sarup te Visheshtavan,
pp 1-12, 'Punjabi Safarnama Pichhokar ate Sarvekhan', pp. 13-32.
85
SANSKRIT
Paper I --Text and Grammar
Internal Assessment
Annual Examination
A. Text (Translation, Explanation)
(i) Bhagavadgita, Chapter 2
(ii) Svapnavasavadattam of Bhasa
(Character Analysis & literary Criticism)
B. Grammar based on the prescribed texts (Sandhi and Karakas
only)
Books Recommended :-
(1) Jaidayal Goendeka -- Bhagavadgita (Gita Press Gorakhpur)
(2) S. Radhakrishnan -- The Bhagavadgita (Hindi
Translation)
(3) Baladeva Upadhyaya -- Sanskrit Sahitya Ka Itihasa
(4) M.R. Kale -- A Higher Sankrit Grammar
(5) V.S. Apte -- A Guide to Sanskrit Composition
(6) Varadraj -- Laghu Siddhanta Kaumudi
(Sridharanand Shastri's Tika)
(7) Jaipal Vidyalankar -- Svapnavasavadattam (Hindi)
(8) M. Hiriyanna -- Outlines of Indian Philosophy
(Chapter on Bhagavadgita)
(9) Kapil Dev Dwivedi -- Sanskrit Sahitya Ka Itihasa
*** Attendance -- 2 marks
House Exam. -- 5 marks
Assignment -- 5 marks
86
PHILOSOPHY
Note : 1. There are three courses out of which a student may choose
one.
2. Every college should offer at least two of these courses.
1. (a) Formal Logic
or
(b) Symbolic Logic
2. Philosophical Investigations
(Readings in Western Philosophy)
3. Theories of Consciousness
(Readings in Classical Indian
Philosophy)
COURSE - I
1. (a) Formal Logic
This course is designed as an introductory course in logic which will
bring out the standard forms of formal and informal reasoning, introducing
basic logical concepts and providing for an understanding of the structure
of arguments and the nature of inferential reasoning as well as some account
of development of techniques for formal testing of syllogisms.
Prescribed Text
Irvin M. Copi : Introduction to Logic (tenth or later editions) chapter 1-
9
Or
1. (b) Symbolic Logic
This course is designed for students who are comfortable with
elementary mathematical and algebraic techniques. It will look at both
truth functional logic and methods of deductive proof, quatification and
predicate logic as well as the logic of relations.
Prescribed Text
Irvin M. Copi : Symbolic Logic (fifth or later editions) chapter 1-6
87
COURSE - II
READINGS IN WESTERN PHILOSOPHY
This introductory course provides a selection of readings from the
western philosophical tradition. The essays or excerpts in this selection,
from some of the most celebrated thinkers in the western philosophical
tradition, have in common an engagement with and an investigation of issues
of general interest and contemporary relevance. The aim of this course
is to stimulate philosophical thinking by providing varied examples of such
reflection.
Prescribed Readings
1. Plato : On Love and madnes s : Phaedrus 227a-258
(in Plato’s: Phaedrus, translated by Walter Hamilton,
Penquin Books, Harmondsworth 1973)
2. Aristotle : On Friendship: Nichomachean Ethics Bk IX
(in Works of Aristotle vol. IX,(ed) W.D.Ross, Oxford
1975)
3. JJ Rousseau : “The origin and foundation of inequality among men”
(in Jean-Jacques Rousseau, The First and Second
Discourses (ed) Roger D. Masters, St. Martin’s Press
New York, 1964)
4. I. Kant : “On Enlightenment” (in Immanuel Kant, Perpetual
Peace and other essays, Hackett 1983)
5. A. Schopenhauer : “On Religion: a dialogue” (in Schopenhauer, Essays
and Aphorisms, trans R.J. HoIIingdale,
Harmondsworth, 1970)
6. F. Nietzsche : “What do Ascetic Ideals mean?” (in Nietzsche: On
the Geneology of Morality (ed) Keith Ansell
Pearson Cambridge 2002)
7. J.P. Sartre : “The body”(in Being and Nothingness, part 3 chapter
2, trans. Hazel Barnes, New York 1970)
8. Richard Taylor : “The meaning of life (in Richard Taylor, Good and
Evil, New York 1970)
88
9. Thomas Nagel : “The absurd” (in Mortal Questions, Cambridge
1979)
Note: Equal weightage will be given to each topic.
Recommended Readings
1. Martha Nussbaum : 'this is isn't true' : Madness, reason and recantation
in The Fragility of Goodness, chapter 7, Cambridge :CUP 1987.
2. A.W. Price : Love and Friendship in Plat and Aristotle, Oxford :
Clarendon Press, 1990.
3. Arthur Koestler, Rousseau, Kant and Goethe, Harper Torch Rooks :
New Yok, 1963.
4. Micheal Foucault, 'What is Enlightenment?' in the Foucault Reader,
Blackwell 1990.
5. Keith Ansell-Pearson, Nietzsche contra Rousseau, Cambridge, CUP,
1996 (esp. chapters 2-4)
6. Leszek Kolakowski, Religion, Fontana Books, 1982.
7. Peter Caws, Sartre, London : Routledge and Kegan Paul 1979 (chapter
VII).
8. Marjorie Grene, Sartre, New York : New Viewpoints, 1973 (chapters 4
& 5).
9. David Wiggins, "Truth invention and the meaning of life" Proceedings
of the British Academy 1979.
10. Albert Camus, The Myth of Sisyphus, Penguin Books 1975.
89
COURSE - III
THEORIES OF CONSCIOUSNESS
(Readings in Classical Indian Philosophy)
The students opting for this course will be given a general perspective on “Cit” or
“Consciousness” from indian classical orthodox and heterodox traditions The aim
of this course is to introduce the students to the diverse theories of consciousness in
Indian philosophy, those of Upanishad, Early Buddhism, Jainism, Carvaka, Mimamsa,
and Advaita Vedanta. Students will be introduced to selective readings from
classical texts with suitable secondary critical readings that will enrich their
understanding of diversity in Indian thinking.
Prescribed Text
1. Kathopanisad : Chapter 1: Valli, I, II & III, Katha Upanisad in
“Ekadasopansadah”, Ed. By V.S. Sastri, (Motilal Banarasidas, Delhi -1966).
2. Bhagavat Gita: Chapter II, Verses 11-30, The Bhagavad Gita (Text
& Translation) by R.C. Zaehner, (Oxford University Press (New York)
-1973).
3. The Questions of King Milinda, Book II Translated from Pali by
T.W. Rhys David, (Motilal Banarasidass Delhi -1965) pp 40-99.
4. Umasvati,Tattvartha Sutra: Chapter 2 (The Institute of Jainology,
Harper Collins Publishers USA, 1994) pp 33-63.
5. Jayanta Bhatta,Nyayamanjari: Dehatmavada (Sariratma-Vadi
Carvaka Mata) (Indian Council of Philosophical Research, New
Delhi, 1990), pp 109-128.
6. Narayan, Manameyodaya (edited with an English Translation by
C. Kunhan Raja and S.S. Suryanarayana Sastri) (The Adyar
Library and Research Centre) pp 195-217.
7 Sankara’s Introduction to the Brahmasutras called Upodghata,
pp 1-4, Brahmasutrasamkarabhasya, (Edited by Vasudeva Sharma,
Published by Tukaram Javaji, Nimaya Sagara, Bombay).
90
Recommended Readings
1. Thirteen Principal Upanisads (Translated by Hune R.E., Oxford
University Press, Oxford -1921).
2. The Bhagavad Gita (Text & Translated by Anneie Besant &
Bhagwan Das, Anmol Publication, Delhi -1987).
3. History of Indian Philosophy Vol.-I (S.N. Dasgupta, Motilal Banarsi
Das, Delhi - 1975).
4. Outline of Indian Philosophy (M. Hiriyana, George Allen & Unwin
India-1973).
5. Indian Philosophy - A Counter Perspective (Daya Krishna, Oxford
University Press, Delhi-1992).
6. Constructive Survey of Upanisadic Philosophy (R.D. Ranade,
Bharatiya Vidya Bhawan, Bombay-1968).
91
CITIZENSHIP IN A GLOBALIZING WORLD
Course Objective
The idea of citizenship holds a prominent place in human history. In
defines who belongs to a political community and who does not. Citizenship
assigns a legal status, a set of rights, immunities and protections in the
modern age. In many ways, the trajectory of the debates surrounding
citizenship have delved into the heart of justice in a community, namely the
relationship between the individual and the collective, the meaning of
membership, and the distribution of benefits and burdens of that membership.
Some concerns about these normative dimensions of citizenship have
changed over time.
The contemporary revival of interest in the concept of citizenship
is a response to developments such as the disintegration of the Soviet
Bloc and the rise of independent states in its wake, the rise of new
forms of virulent nationalism and sub-nationalism, and globalization
and migration. In addition, demands for political recognition by
minorities based on new sources and forms of identity have wrought
significant changes in the way we conceive of citizenship. States
are scrambling to deal with tensions created in increasingly complex
and diverse societies and the idea of citizenship seeks to
simultaneously cross national boundaries.
This course will explore theories of citizenship, the historical
development of the concept and its practice of in an increasingly globalizing
world.
1. Classical conceptions of citizenship
2. The Evolution of Citizenship and the Modern State
3. Citizenship and Diversity
4. Citizenship beyond the Nation-state: Globalization and global justice
5. The idea of cosmopolitan citizenship
Readings
Required :
* Beiner, R. (1995) Theorising Citizenship. Albany : State University of
New York Press.
* Held, David (1995), Democracy and the Global Order : From the
92
Modern State to Cosmopolitan Governance (Stanford : Stanford
University Press).
* Kymlicka, Will (1999), "Citizenship in an Era of Globalization : A
Response to Held," in Ian Shapiro and Casiono Hacker-Cordon (eds.)
Democracy's Edges (Cambridge. UK : Cambridge University Press).
* Oliver, D. and D. Heater (1994). The Foundations of Citizenship.
London. Harvester Wheatsheaf.
* Schotle, Jan Aart (2000), Globalization : A Critical Introduction (New
York : St. Martin's).
* Zolo, Danilo (1997), Cosmopolis : Prospects for World Government
(Cambridge. UK : Polity Press).
* Spinner. J. (1994). The Boundaries of Citizenship : Race, Ethnicity
and Nationality in the Liberal State. Baltimore, Johns Hopkins
University Press.
Recommended :
* Archibugi, Daniele, Held, David and Koehler, Martin (ed.) (1998), Reimagining
Political Community : Studies in Cosmopolitan
Democracy (Standford : Stanford University Press).
* Baubock, R. (1994). Transnational Citizenship : Membership and
Rights in International Migration. Brooksfield : Edward Elgar.
* Carcfa C.N. (1996). Consumers and Citizens : Multicultural conflicts
in the proceses of globalization. Minneapolis : University of
Minneapolis Press.
* Clarke, P., ed. (1994). Citizenship. London, Pluto Press.
* Dallmayr, Fred (1998), Alternative Visions : Paths in the Global
Village (Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield).
* Jones, Charles (1999), Global Justice : Defending Cosmopolitanism
(Oxford : Oxford University Press).
* Pogge, Thomas (2001), "Priorities of Global Justice, " Metaphilosophy
32; 6-24.
* Scheuerman, William E. (1999), "Globalization, Exceptional Powers, and
the Erosion of Liberal Democracy," Radical Philosopy 93; 14-23.
93
HISTORY
Group A
(1) Culture in India : a historical perspective.
(2) Delhi : Ancient, Medieval and Modern.
Group B
(1) Religion and Religiosity in India.
(2) Inequality and Difference in India.
Note : To abviate administrative difficulties, the four courses have been
divided into two groups : A and B. Colleges are requird to offer at
least two papers choosing one from each course. Group A may be
offered for a four year period 2005-9 and then Group B in rotation.
The four courses have been designed keeping several important factors in
mind.
(1) As per the requirements of the University's proposal that these courses
be of B.A. (Honours) standard, therefore requiring a serious
engagement with the discipline and its variety.
(2) Since those opting for these courses will be completing an Honours
degree in disciplines other than History, these courses try to engage
with interdisciplinary work done by historians engaging with methods in
literary criticism, sociology and economics etc.
(3) Keeping in mind the fact that a) the courses are of 50 marks and b)
that teachers at the undergraduate level have heavy workloads, each
course is structured around readings that do not run into more than 300
pages to be done over the year.
(4) The syllabi are structured in a user-friendly manner in which the themes and
the readings associated with them are clearly demarcated and a supplementary list
ofreadingsforfurther information on historical background is provided.
(5) Given that college teachers are appointed according to specialization,
each course has an Ancient, Medieval and Modern section so that
colleges can opt to teach any of these sections, depending on the teacherspecializations
in that particular college.
94
(6) An important feature of this course is that it attempts in introduce the
best and most innovative of historical scholarship to a student audience
drawn from disciplines other than history. The choice of themes rather
than a strict chronological sequence arises from the assumption that
students will have already a basic knowledge of Indian history from
their years of schooling.
(7) The success of such a multidisciplinary course depends on the UGC
and other grant making bodies making a one-times special grant to all
colleges for acquisition of the readings.
95
CULTURE IN INDIA : ANCIENT
This course explores various aspects of Indian culture in a historical
perspective through scholarship of an interdisciplinary nature. Classical
and folk narratives, textual and visual traditions, the interpretation of cultural
practices through material remains, the iconograpohy and meaning of ancient
images are explored in the section on ancient India.
1. Interpreting the material remains of cultural practice.
Alexandra Ardeleanu-Jansen, "The Terracotta Figurines from Mohenjo
Daro : Considerations on Tradition, Craft and Ideology in the Harappan
Civilization (c. 2400-1800 BC).
S.Settar, "Memorial Stones in South India," in S. Settar and Gunther D.
Sontheimer eds. Memorial Stones: a study of their origin,
significance and variety (Dharwad: no date).
2. Classical Sanskrit drama and poetry.
The Natyashastra of Bharatamuni, transl. by Adya Rangachari (Delhi,
1986), chap. 25 ('Men and Women: outward characterizations') and
chap. 34 (Types of character').
Meghadutam, Uttara-Meghah section in Chandra Rajan, The Loom
of Time (New Delhi, Penguin, 1989), verses 66-174 (pp. 152-164), and
Introduction.
Romila Thapar, Shakuntala: Texts, Readings, Histories (N. Delhi,
2000), Chapter 3, pp. 44-82.
3. The Ramayana and Mahabharata - stories, characters, versions.
A.K. Ramanujan, "300 Ramayanas : five examples and three thoughts
on translation." In Paula Richman ed., Many Ramayanas: the diversity
of a narrative tradition in South Asia (N. Delhi, 1992), pp. 22-49.
Iravati Karve, Yuganta : The end of an epoch (Hyderabad : Disha
Books, 1974), Chapter 9, pp. 138-158 (chapter on Karna).
4. Early Tamil poems, poets, and patrons.
A.K. Ramanujan, The Interior landscape: love poems from a
classical Tamil anthology (Bloomington and London, 1975).
96
David Shulman, "Poets and Patrons in Tamil Literary legend," In The
Wisdom of Poets : Studies in Tamil, Talugu and Sanskrit (New Delhi,
2001), pp. 63-102.
5. Folk narratives, ancient and contemporary.
Uma Chakravarti, "Women, Men, and Beasts : The Jatakas as Popular
Tradition," Studies in History, 9, 1, n.s. (1993), pp 43-70.
A.K. Ramanujan, Folk Tales from India; a selection of oral tales
from twenty-two-language (New York, 1991), Introduction, pp. xiiixxxii.
Vijaya Ramaswamy, "Women and the 'Domestic' in Tamil folk Songs,"
in Kumkum Sangari and Uma Chakravarti eds. From Myths to
Markets: Essay on Gender (Simla and N. Delhi, 2001), pp. 39-55.
6. Religious icons and their makers; the modern histories of
ancient images.
Susan L. Huntington, The Art of Ancient India : Buddhist, Hindu,
Jain (New York Tokyo), pp. 532-36 (on the metal images of South
India and the iconography of the Nataraja).
Vijaya Ramaswamy, "Visvakarma craftmen in Medieval Peninsular
India," Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient,
vol. 47, No. 4 (2004).
Richard H. Davis, The Lives of Indian Images, (N. Delhi, 1999),
chapter 7 ('Loss and Recovery of Ritual Self,' pp. 222-259.
Supplementary readings : Michel Postel and Zarine Cooper, Bastar
Fold Art: Shrines, figurines and memorials (Mumbai : Project for
Indian Cultural Studies Publication VII, 1999).
Paula Richman ed., Many Ramayanas: the diversity of a narrative
tradition in South Asia (N. Delhi, 1992).
Paula Richman ed., Questioning Ramayanas : a South Asian tradition
(N. Delhi, 2000).
Robert P. Goldman, The Ramayana of Valmiki : an epic of ancient
India, Interoduction.
C. Sivaramamurti, Nataraja in art, though and literature.
Ananda K. Coomaraswamy, The Dance of Shiva," in The Dance of
Shiva (reprint edn., New Delhi, 1968), pp. 66-78.
97
CULTURE IN INDIA MEDIEVAL
Medieval culture is analysed through the themes of kingship traditions,
social processes of religious devotion, records of inter-cultural
perception, forms of identities, and aesthetics. The idea is to integrate
existing historiography of the period which deals with issues of state
policy and formation with the larger domain of culture.
Required Readings :
1. Kingship & court : mixing the classic with the folk
David Shulman, The King & Clown in South Indian Myth & Poetry
(Princeton : Princeton University Press, 1985) Chapter 4, pp. 152-213.
C.M. Naim, "Popular Jokes and Political History, The Case of Akbar,
Birbal and Mulla Do-Piyaza" in Economic and Political Weekly, vol.
XXXV, June 1995, pp. 1456-1464.
Monika Horstmann, "Religious dignitaries in the court protocol of Jaipur,
mid 18th to early 19th century", in George Berkemer ed. Explorations
in the history of South Asia : essays in honour of Dietmar
Rothermund (Delhi; Manohar, 2001), pp. 139-55.
2. Devotionalism
J.R.I. Cole, "Popular Shi'ism" in idem, Roots of North Indian Shi'ism
in Iran and Iraq, Religion and State in Awadh, 1722-1859 (Delhi :
OUP, 1989) pp. 92-119.
R. Champakalakshmi, "From devotion and dissent to dominance : The
bhakti of the Tamil Alvars and Nayanars" in Champakalakshmi & S.
Gopal, eds, Tradition, Dissent and Ideology : Essays in Honour of
Romila Thapar (Delhi : OUP, 1996).
3. Perceiving Cultures
Brajadulal Chattopadhyaya, Representing the Other? Sanskrit
Sources and the Muslims (Eight to Fourteenth Century) (New Delhi
: Manohar, 1998) pp. 28-43, 92-97.
Richard Eaton, "The Articulation of Islamic Space in the Medieval
Deccan" in Essays on Islam & Indian History (Delhi: OUP, 2000)
pp.159-175.
98
Richard Eaton, "Multiple Lenses: Differing Perspectives of Fifteenth
Century Calicut" in Essays on Islam & Indian History (Delhi : OUP,
2000) pp. 76-92.
4. Negotiating identities
Carla Petievich, "Gender politics and the Urdu ghazal: Exploratory
observations on Rekhta versus Rekhti" in The Indian the Economic
and Social/History Review, vol. 38/3, 2001, pp. 223-248.
Aditya Behl, 'The Magic Doe: Desire and Narrative in a Hindavi Sufi
Romance, circa 1503" in Richard Eaton, ed., India's Islamic Traditions
711-1750 (Delhi : OUP, 2003) pp. 180-208.
5. Painting, architecture, music
Ebba Koch, "The Hierarchical Principles of Shah-Jahani Painting" in
Mughal Art and Imperial Ideology (Delhi : OUP) pp. 130-162.
Brian Silver, 'The Adab of Musicians', in B.D. Metcalfe, Moral
Conduct and Authority, (Berkeley : University of California Press,
1984), pp. 315-332.
General Readings
Muzaffar Alam & Sanjay Subrahmanyam, eds, The Mughal State
(1526-1750) (Delhi : OUP, 1998) pp. 126-167.
Karine Schomer & W.H. McLeod eds. The Sants, Studies in
Devotional Tradition of India (Delhi : Motilal Banarsidass, 1987) pp.
375-383.
J.S. Hawley, Three Bhakti Voice, Mirabai, Surdas, and Kabir in
their Time and Ours (Delhi : OUP, 2005) pp. 181-193 & 368-371.
M.H. Fisher, Counterflows to Colonialism : Indian Travellers &
Setters in Britain 1600-1857 (New Delhi : Permanent Black, 2004).
Barbara Daly Metcalf, ed., Moral Conduct and Authority, The Place
of Adab in South Asian Islam, (Berkeley : University of California
Press, 1984) pp. 357-371.
R.P. Rana, "Change protest and politics : situating Jat revolts of the late
17th and early 18th centuries", Social Science Probings, 16, 2, 2004,
pp. 53-74.
99
CULTURE IN INDIA : MODERN
In the section on modern India, the staples of history writing-nationalism,
the state, and the people are looked at through newer perspectives like oral
history, film, and the popular imagination. The readings are specially designed
for non-specialists to allow them window into the historians craft and the
use of methods of different social sciences like sociology, anthropology and
literary criticism.
1. History of Sport
Ramachandra Guha, "Cricket and politics in colonial India", Past and
Present, 161, 1998, pp. 155-90.
Ashis Nandy, "The wistful camel and the eye of the needle", in The
Tao of Cricket : on Games of Destiny and the Destiny of Games
(Delhi : Oxford University Press, 2000), pp. 52-89.
2. Film and the Arts
Sumita Chakravarty, "National Identity and the realist aesthetic" in
National Identity in Indian Popular Cinema,1947-87 (Delhi : Oxford
University Press, 1998), pp. 80-118.
Tapati Guha-Thakurta, "The demands of independence: from a national
exhibition to a national museum", in Monuments, Objects, Histories :
Institutions of Art in Colonial and Post-Colonial India (Delhi :
Permanent Black, 2005), 175-204.
3. Gender identities
Ashis Nandy, The Intimate Enemy : Loss and recovery of Self under
Colonialism (Delhi Oxford University Press, 1983), pp.
Tanika Sarkar, "A book of her own, a life of her own : the autobiography of
a 19th century woman", in Hindu Wife, Hindu Nation: Community,
Religion and Cultural nationalism (Delhi: Permnent Black, 2001),
pp. 95-134.
4. Oral History
Rustom Bharucha, "The past in the present", in Rajasthan : an Oral
History : Conversations with Komal Kothari (Delhi : Penguin Books,
2003), pp. 16-35.
100
Stuart Blackburn, "Colonial contract in the "hidden land: oral history
among the Apatanis of Arunachal Pradesh", Indian Economic and
Social History Review, 40, 3, 2003.
5. Music and the Music Industry
Peter Manuel, "Cassettes and the modern ghazal', in Cassette
Culture : Popular Music and Technology in North India (Delhi :
Oxford University Press, 2001), pp. 89-104.
Amanda Weidman, "The guru and the gramophone : fantasies of fidelity
and modern technologies of the real", in Public Culture, 15, 3, 2003,
453-76
6. Popular visual culture
Christopher Pinney, "The politics of popular images : from cow protection
to M.K. Gandhi", in Photos of the Gods' : the Printed Image and
Political Struggle in India (London : Reaktion Books, 2004), pp. 105-
44 (including plates).
Patricia Uberoi, "Unity in diversity' : dilemmas of nationhood in Indian
calender art", Contributions to India Sociology, 36, 2, 2002, p. 191-
232 (including plates).
General reading
Richard Lannoy, The Speaking Tree (New York : Oxford University
Press, 1981).
K.Moti Gokulsing and Wimal Dissanayake, Indian Popular Cinema :
A Narrative of Cultural Change (Hyderabad : Orient Longman, 1998).
Tapati Guha-Thakurta, The making of a New 'Indian' Art" Artists,
Aesthetics and Nationalism in Bengal, 1850-1920 (Delhi : Cambridge
University Press, 1992).
101
ANCIENT DELHI
This course segment will discuss the history of Delhi and its surrounding
areas as reflected in literature, archaeology, myth, history and memory.
The section of Ancient Delhi will have a special focus on the remains of
the stone age, late Harappan sites, the Purana Qila excavations and the
Mahabharata legend, the Ashokan edict at Bahapur, the iron pillar at Mehrauli,
and the remains of an early medieval settlement at Lal Kot. The
reconstitution and reinterpretation of ancient remains in medieval and modern
times will be illustrated through a discussion of the iron pillar at Mehrauli,
the two Ashokan pillar, and the practice of the worship of ancient images in
modern village shrines.
1. Stone age sites in the Delhi area.
A. K. Grover and P.L. Bakliwal, "River Migration and the Floods-A
Study of Yamuna river through Remote Sensing," Man and
Environment 9 (1985), pp. 151-3.
Dilip K. Chakrabarti and N. Lahiri, "A Preliminary Report on the Stone
Age of the Union Territory of Delhi and Haryana," Man and
Environment, 11 (1987), pp. 109-16.
A.K. Sharma, Prehistoric Delhi and its Neighbourhood, New Delhi, 1993.
Upinder Singh, Ancient Delhi (New Delhi, 1999), pp. 1-20.
2. Protohistoric settlements : later Harappan remains at Bhorgarh
and Mandoli.
B.S.R. Babu, "A Late Harappan Settlement in Delhi," in C.
Margabandhu and K.S. Ramachandran eds., Spectrum of Indian (Prof.
S.B. Deo Felicitation vol.), Delhi, 1996, pp. 98-104.
B.S.R. Babu, "Excavations at Bhorgarh," Puratattva, No. 25 (1994-
95), pp. 88-93.
B.R. Mani, Delhi : Threshold of the Orient (Studies in
Archaeological Excavations) (New Delhi, 1997), pp. 17-25.
R.C. Thakran, "Protohistorical archaeological remains in the Union
Territory of Delhi", Proceedings of the Indian History Congress,
Calcutta session, 1990, pp. 800-806.
102
3. Archaeology and legend: The Purana Qila excavations and the
Mahabharata legend; Painted Grey Ware sites.
Indian Archaeology - A Review, 1954-55 (pp. 13-14); 1969-70
(pp.4-6); 1970-71) (pp. 8-11).
J.B. van Buitenen trans. Mahabharata, (Chicago : Chicago University
Press) Sabha Parva (description of Indraprastha)
B.D. Chattopadhyaya, "Indian Archaeology and the Epic Traditions,"
in Studying Early India : Archeology, Texts, and Historical
Issues (N. Delhi, 2003), pp. 29-38.
S.P. Gupta and K.S. Ramachandran eds., Mahabharata - Myth and
Relaity . differing views (Delhi, 1976), Introduction.
4. The early historic period; the Ashokan rock edict at
Shrinivaspuri/Bahapur.
M.C. Joshi and B.M. Pande, "A Newly-discovered Inscription of
Ashoka at Bahapur. Delhi," Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society
of Great Britain and Ireland, 1967, parts 3-4, pp. 96-98. D.C.
Sircar, "New Delhi Inscription of Asoka," Epigraphia Indica, 38
(1969-70), pp. 1-4. Upinder Singh, Ancient Delhi (New Delhi,
1999), pp. 46-56.
B.r. Mani, Delhi threshold of the Orient (Studies in Archaeological
Excavations) (New Delhi, 1997), pp. 35-37.
5. Remains of the 4th-6th centuries; the Mehrauli iron pillar
M.C. Joshi ed., Kind Chandra and the Meharauli pillar (Meerut,
1989).
B. Chhabra and G.S. Gai ed., Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum,
vol. 3 : Inscriptions of the early Gupta kings (New Delhi, 1981), pp. 257-
259.
6. The early medieval period; Lal Kot and Anangpur
B.R. Mani, Excavations at Lal Kot 1991 and Further Explorations in
Delhi," Puratattva, No. 22 (1991-2), pp. 75-87.
B.R. Mani and I.D. Dwivedi, 'Anangpur Fort : The Earliest Tomar
Settlement near Delhi," Puratattava, No. 24 (1993-4), pp. 41-43.
103
7. The medieval and modern history of ancient remains : the
Ashokan Delhi-Meerut and Delhi-Topra pillers; the iron pillar;
and the worship of ancient images in modern village shrines.
Upinder Singh. Ancient Delhi (New Delhi, 1999), pp. 56-62, 73-74,
81-83.
Nayanjot Lahiri and Upinder Singh, "In the shadow of New Delhi :
understanding the landscape through village eyes.: In Peter J. Ucko
and Robert Layton, The Archaeology and Anthropology of
Landscape, (1999), pp. 175-188.
Supplementary Readings :
Delhi Gazeteer (Delhi, 1976), pp 1-46.
Upinder Singh, Ancient Delhi (New Delhi, 1999)
Alexander Cunningham, Archaeological Survey of India : Four
Reports made during the year 1862-63. 64-65, vol. 1 (Simla, 1871;
reprint edn., Delhi, Varanasi), pp. 131-174.
Y.d. Sharma, Delhi and its neighbourbood (New Delhi :
Archaeological Sruvey of India, 1990) pp. 1-2, 8-16.
B.R. Mani, Delhi: Threshold of the Orient (Studies in
Archaeological Excavations) (New Delhi, 1997), pp. 25-35.
R.C. Thakran, "Implications of Partition on the proto-historical
investigation in the Ghaggar-Ganga basin", Social Scientist, 2000, pp.
42-67.
104
MEDIEVAL DELHI
The medieval history of the cities of Delhi is associated with the
Sultanate and the Mughals, with the Sufis, the courtiers and the poets who
resided here. It is concerned with the artisanate, the commercial groups
and brokers, the bazaars and their hinterlands that created a glittering
emporium and a culture of urbanity that seized the imagination of the peopole
of the age.
Required Readings :
(1) An account of the many cities :
Athar Ali, 'Capital of the Sultans : Delhi during the 13th and 14th
centuries' in R. Frykenberg, Delhi through the Ages, (Delhi ; OUP,
1986), pp. 34-44.
J. Burton Page, 'Dihli: History, Monuments' in Encyclopaedia of Islam,
vol. 2, pp. 255-66.
Ebba Koch, 'The Delhi of the Mughals prior to Shahjahanbad as reflected
in the patterns of Imperial Visits', in Ebba Koch, Mughal Art and
Imperial Ideology, (Delhi : OUP, 2001), pp. 163-82.
(2) Delhi as Imperial Camp and Cioty :
Mohammad Habib, 'Introduction to Elliot and Dowson's History of India
vol. II', in, Khaliq Nizami, ed., Politics and Society during the Early
Medieval Period, Collected Works of Professor Habib, vol. 1, pp.
80-4.
Sunil Kumar, 'Qutb and Modern Memory' in Sunil Kumar, The Present
in Delhi's Pasts, (Delhi: Three Essays Press, 2002), pp. 1-61.
Peter Jackson, 'The Problems of a vast Military Encampment', in R.E.
Frykenberg, Delhi Through the Ages : Essays in Urban History,
Culture and Society, (Delhi : OUP, 1986) pp. 18-33.
Stephen P. Blake, 'Cityscape of an Imperial Capital : Shahjahanabad in
1739' in R.E. Frykenburg, Delhi Through the Ages : Essays in Urban
History, Culture and Society, (Delhi : OUP, 1986), pp. 152-91.
105
(3) Delhi as Economc centre :
Selections relating to the bazaars and artisanal activities in
Shahjahanabad from Francois Bernier, Travels in the Mogul Empire,
AD 1656-68, (Delhi : Low Price Publications, 1989 reprint), pp. 239-
84.
Shama Mitra Chenoy, Shahjahanabad : A City of Delhi, 1638-1857,
(Delhi : Vedamse Books (P) Ltd., 1998), Chapter 7.
(4) Delhi as social and cultural centre :
Zoya' al-Din Barani, Ta'rikh-i-Firuz Shahi, Hindi trans. S.A.A. Rizvi,
Adi Turk Kalin Bharat, PP. 232-9; Adi Khalaji kalin Bharat,
pp. 15-21.
Selections from Dargah Quli Khan, Moraqqa-i-Dehli, trans.
Chandra Shekhar and Shama Mitra Chenoy, (Delhi : Deputy Publication,
1989).
Niccolao Manucci, Storia do Mogor, trans. William Irvine, (Delhi :
Low Price Publications, 1990 reprint), vol. 2, pp. 308-58.
Shamsur Rahman Faruqi, Early Urdu Literary Culture and History,
(Delhi : OUP, 2001), pp. 145-84.
General Reading
Y.D. Sharma, Delhi and its neighbourhood (N. Delhi : Archaeological
Survey of India, 1990).
J.A. Page, An Historical Memoir on the Qutb: Delhi, (Delhi : ASI
Memoir no. 22, 1998 reprint).
J.A. Page, ed., List of Mohammedan and Hindu Monuments, Delhi
Province, (Delhi: ASI, 1913), 4 vols..
R.E. Frykenberg, Delhi Through the Ags : Essays in Urban History,
Culture and Society, (Delhi: OUP, 1986).
Stephen Blake, Shahjabanabad: the Sovereign City in Mughal India,
1639-1739, (Cambridge : University Press, 1991).
Ebba Koch, Mughal Art and Imperial Ideology, (Delhi: OUP, 2001).
106
MODERN DELHI
Modern Delhi is explored through its imperial monuments and
architecture, its literary and visual culture as also the formation of the city
through histories of migration, displacement and violence. It takes the student
from the 18th century to the 20th century and maps on the history of
colonialism, and the post colonial experience on to social history and the
history of imaginative practices.
Required Readings
1. Delhi : from the Battle of Patparganj to the Ghadar of 1857 - An
Overview.
Narayani Gupta, Delhi Between the Empires: 1803-1931 (Delhi: OUP,
second impression, 1999), ch. 1, pp. 1-20.
Gali Minault, 'Qiran al-Sa'adain: The Dialogue between Eastern and
Western Learning at Delhi College', in Jamal Malikk ed., Perspectives
on Mutual Encounters in South Asian History (Leiden, Brill, 2000),
pp. 260-277.
2. Literary Cultures of Delhi
Pavan Varma, Ghalib, the Man, His Times (Penguin, 1989),
pp. 86-139.
C.M. Naim, 'Ghalib's Delhi: a Shamelessly Revisionist Look at two
Popular Metaphors', (Delhi : Permanent Black, 2004), pp. 250-73.
3. The Ghadar and its aftermath in the life of Delhi
Narayani Gupta, Delhi between the Empires, pp. 20-31, 50-66.
Nayanjot Lahiri, "Commemorating and Remembering 1857 : The Revolt
in Delhi and its Afterlife', World Archaeology vol. 35, no 1 (June 2003).
4. The Making of New Delhi
Thomas Metcalf, 'Architecture and Empire : Herbert Baker and New
Delhi', in Frykenberg ed., Delhi Through the Ages, pp. 391-400.
R.G. Irving, Indian Summer: Lutyens, Baker and the Making of
Imperial Delhi (Yale University Press, Yale, 1981).
107
5. Delhi : Partition and After
Gynaendra Pandey, Remembering Partition (Cambridge University
Press, 2001), Ch. 6.
Begum Anees Kidwai, Azaadi ki Chhaon Mein (NBT, Delhi : Hindi
tr. of Urdu original, 1980), c. 3. pp. 38-65.
V.N. Datta, 'Punjabi Refugees and the Urban Development of Delhi',
in Frykenberg ed., Delhi through the Ages, 442-462.
6. Violence, Dislocations, Expansions
Emma Tarlo, 'Welcome to History : A Resettlement Colony in the
Making', in V. Duppont et al ed., Delhi: Urban Spaces and Human
Destinies (Delhi: Manohar Publications, 1999) pp. 51-75.
Anita Soni, 'Urban Conquest of Outer Delhi : Benficiaries, Intermediaries
and Victims', in Delhi: Urban Spaces and Human Destinies, pp. 75-
94.
Aditya Nigam, 'Theatre of the Urban: The Strange Case of the Monkey
Man', in Sarai Reader 02 (Delhi : CSDS, 2002).
7. Layers of History and Memory in Delhi
Charles and Karoki Lewis, Delhi's Historic Villages : A Photographic
Evocation (Delhi : Ravi Dayal Publisher. 1997), Begampur, pp.
33-54.
Narayani Gupta, 'From Architecture to Archaeology : The
"Monumentalizing' of Delhi's History in the Nineteenth Century', in
Jamal Malik ed., Perspectives on Mutual Encounters in South Asian
History (Leiden, Brill, 2000), pp. 49-65.
Shahid Amin, 'Past Remains', Conversations, vol. 3, no. 2, Summer
2003, pp. 77-84 (with plates); IIC Quarterly, Winter 2001, pp. (without
plates)
Supplementary Readings/Viewings
Ali Sardar Jafri, Deevan-e-Ghalib (Hindi) (Delhi : Rajkamal
Paperbacks, 1990) bhumika, pp. 1-15 and Poem no. 21 (except sh'ers
3, 4, 8); no. 27 (except sh'ers 3 and 9); no. 33 no. 79 (except sh'ers 2,5
and 6); no. 111 (except sh'ers 3,4,6 and 7).
108
Media Nagar 01 (Sarai, CSDS, 2004) (Hindi), p. 7-13, 14-19, 20-30
(articles by Pulorna Pal, Faizan Ahmad, Bhagwati Prasad. English
version in Publics and Practices in the History of the Present (Resource
CD, produced by, Sarai/CSDS) Focus on Delhi. http://pphp.sarai.net/
Begum Akhtar Sings Ghalib, LP and cassette, HMV
Gulzar's Mirza Ghalib, 1988, TV serial (VCD)
Ralph Russell and Khurshidul Islam, Three Mughal Poets : Mir-Sauda-
Mir Hasan (Delhi : OUP, 1988) section on Mir.
Ameer Ali, Twilight in Delhi (A Novel in English) Urdu tr. by Bilkqis
Jahan Dilli Ki Ek Sham (Maktab-Jamia Millia, New Delhi)
Mohan Rakesh, Andhere Band Kamre : A Novel in Hindi (Rajkamal
Prakashan, Dilli)
Krishna Sobti, 'Abhi Dilli Door Hai', Pts. I-II, Hans, Sept-Oct. 1987.
The Past is a Foreign Country a The Past is a Foreign Country [on
Purana Qila] documentary (on Purana Qila), by Anand V. Taneja,
Akshay Singh, Sakina Ali on Purana Qila documentary, by Anand v.
Taneja, Akshay Singh, Sakina Ali (2004).
Narayani Gupta & James Masselos, Beato's Delhi, 1857, 1997 (Delhi:
Ravi Dayal Publishers 2000).
109
RELIGION AND RELIGIOUSITY : ANCIENT INDIA
This course explores problems both of belief and faith as well as of
defining religious boundaries. It looks at identities through a nuanced
notion of overlaps and sared symbols, institutions, beliefs, and practices.
1. The problem of defining religious categories :
Gavin Flood, An Introduction to Hinduism, (N. Delhi, 2004),
pp. 5-22.
David N. Lorenzen, "Who Invented Hinduism?" Comparative Studies
in Society and History, 1999, pp. 630-59.
2. The renunciatory traditions :
Peter Harvey, An Introduction to Buddhism : teachings, history
and practices (N. Delhi, 1991), chap. 3 (pp. 47-72).
Uma Chakravarti, "The Social Philosophy of Buddhism and the Problem
of Inequality," in Social Compass, 33, 2-3 (1986), pp. 199-221.
Kendall W. Folkert, Scripture and Community: Collected Essays on
the Jains ed. By John E. Cort (Atlanta, 1993), Chapter 1 (pp. 1-19).
3. Vaishnava and Shaiva devotional cults :
Bimal Matilal, "Krsna : In Defence of a Devious Divinity," in "The
Collected Essays of Bimal Krishna Motilal: Ethics and Epics,": ed. J.
Ganeri (N. Delhi, 2002), pp. 91-108.
Selections from A.K. Rakanujan, Hymns for the Drowing (Delhi,
Penguin, 1993) pp. 4-6, 22-27, 54-57.
A.K. Ramanujan, Speaking of Siva (Harmondsworth, 1973),
Introduction (pp. 19-55).
Uma Chakravarti, "The World of the Bhaktin in South Indian Traditions
- The body and beyond," Manushi, 50-2, 1982, pp. 18-29; reprinted in
Kumkum Roy ed., Women in Early Indian Societies, pp. 299-321.
4. The temple; temple cities; royal temple policy:
R. Champakalakshmi, "Urbanization from Above : Tanjavur, The
Ceremonial City of the Colas," in Trade, Ideology and Urbanization:
110
South India 3000 BC to AD 1300 (Delhi, 1996), Chapter 8, pp. 424-
441.
Hermann Kulke, "Royal Temple Policy and the Structure of Medieval
Hindu Kingdoms" in A. Eschmann, H. Kulke, and G.C. Tripathi eds.,
The Cult of Jagannath and the Regional Tradition of Orissa (N.
Delhi, 1978), pp. 125-38.
5. Pilgrimage and patronage
Romila Thapar, "Patronage and the Community," in Barbara Stoler Miller
ed., The Powers of Art : Patronage in Indian Culture (Delhi, 1992),
pp. 19-34.
U. Singh, "Sanchi : The History of the patronage of an ancient Buddhist
establishment," in The Indian Economic and Social History Review,
33, 1 (1996), pp. 1-35.
General Readings
R. Champakalakshmi and Usha Kris, The Hindu Temple (New Delhi,
Roli Books, 2001), Chaps. 1 and 2, pp. 9-26.
S.M. Bhardwaj, Hindu Places of Pilgrimage in India (Delhi and
Berkeley, 1973).
Gunther-Dietz Sontheimer, "Hinduism: The five components and their
interaction," in Gunther-Dietz Sontheimer and Hermann Kulke eds,
Hinduism Reconsidered (New Delhi: Manohar Publications 2001),
pp. 305-324.
Lous Renou, "Religions of Ancient India," (New Delhi reprint, 1972),
Chap. 6 (pp. 111-133. (chapter on Jainism).
Mandakranta Bose ed. Faces of the Feminine in Ancient, Medieval,
and Modern India (N. Delhi, 2000), pp. 124-147.
I.B. Horner, Women Under Primitive Buddhism : Laywomen and
Almswomen, extract in Kumkum Roy ed. Women in Early Indian
Society, pp. 82-112.
111
Uma Chakravarti, The Social Dimensions of Early Buddhism (Delhi :
Oxford University Press, 1996).
Dilip Chakrabarti, "The Archaeology of Hinduism," in Timothy Insoll
ed., Archaeology and World Religion (London and New York :
Routledge 2001) pp. 33-59.
Elizabeth A. Bachus and Nayanjot Lahiri eds. The Archaeology of
Hinduism, "World Archaeology, vol. 36, No. 3, Sept. 2004, pp.
313-325.
Vijaya Ramaswamy, Walking Naked: Women, Society, Spirituality
in South India (Shimla : IIAS, 1997).
Barbara Stoler Miller ed., The Powers of Art : Patronage in Indian
Culture (Delhi : Oxford University Press 1992).
A.L. Basham, The Wonder That Was India, pp. 256-312.
112
RELIGION AND RELIGIOSITY : MEDIEVAL INDIA
This course explores problems both belief and faith as well as of defining
religious boundaries. The Middle Ages in India were the years that saw
the historical evolution of piety and religious systems into forms familiar to
us today. Through themes that touch upon communities of belief sustained
through visual and oral practices, practices, shared spaces between beliefs
and practices and 'conversions', students are introduced to the universe of
a multitude of religious organizatons and an infinite variety of religiosity.
Required Readings:
1. Communities of Belief :
Carl Ernst, 'The Textual Formation of Oral Teachings in the Early Chishti
Order in Eternal Garden: Mysticism, History and Politics at a South
Asian Sufi Center, (Albany : State University of New York Press),
pp. 62-84.
W.H. McLeod, 'The Janam-Sakhis' in The Evolution of the Sikh
Community : Five Essays, (Oxford : Clarendon Press, 1976), pp. 20-36.
A.K. Ramanujan, Hymns for the Drawing, (Delhi : Penguin, 1993),
pp. 4-6, 22-7, 54-7.
2. Practices :
Carl W. Ernst and Bruce B. Lawrence, 'The Major Chishti Shrines' in
The Chishti Order in South Asia and Beyond, (New York : Palgrave
Macmillan, 2002), pp. 85-104.
Richard Eaton, 'Sufi Folk Literarure and the Expansion of Indian Islam'
in Essays on Islam and Indian History, (Delhi ; OUP, 2000),
pp. 189-99.
David N. Lorenzen, 'Who invented Hinduism', Comparative Studies
in Society and History, vol. 41, (1999), pp. 630-59.
3. Shared Spaces :
Phillip B. Wagoner, "Sultan among Hindu Kings: Dress, Titles and the
Islamicization of Hindu Culture at Vijayanagara" in Journal of Asian
Studies 55 (1996), pp. 851-880.
113
Subrahmanyam, Sanjay, 'Violence and Identites in South Asia:
Grievances and Memory in Community Formation', Purusartha,. 22
(2001), pp. 47-70.
Phukan, Shantanu, "Through throats where many rivers meet" : the
Ecology of Hindi in the world of Persian', Indian Economic and Social
History Review, 38 (2001), 33-58.
4. Conversions :
Richard M. Eaton, The Rise of Islam and the Bengal Frontier 1204-
1760, (Delhi : OUP, 1997 reprint), Ch. 10.
Dominique Sila-Khan, Conversions and Shifting Identities : Ramdeo
Pir and Ismailis and Rajasthan (Delhi : Manohar, 2003), pp 29-59.
General/Reading
Marshal Hodgson, Venture of Islam : Conscience and History in a
World Civilization, (Chicago University of Chicago Press, 1974), vol.
1, pp. 3-69, 315-472; 201-54; 437-531.
Carl W. Ernst and Bruce B. Lawence, The Chishti Order in South
Asia and Beyod, (New York : Palgrve Macmillan, 2002).
Richard Eaton, The Rise of Islam and the Bengal Frontier 1204-
1760, (Delhi : OUP, 1997 reprint).
Richard Eaton, Sufis of Bijapur, (Princeton : University Press, 1978).
Simon Digby, "Sufi Sheikh as the source of authority in medieval India",
Purusartha, 9, 1989, 52-79.
Charlotte Vaudverille, Kabir, (Oxford : Clarendon Press, 1974), pp.
81-148.
David Lorenzen ed., Religious Movements in South Asia, 600-1800,
(Delhi : OUP, 2004)
Karine Schomer and W.H. McLeod, The Sants : Studies in a
Devotional Tradition of India, (Delhi : Motilal Banarsidas, 1987).
114
Vijaya Ramaswamy, Walking Naked : Women, Society, Spirituality
in South India (Shimla : IIAS, 1997).
Athar Ali, "Encounter and efflorescence : genesis of the medieval
civilization" Proceeding of the Indian History Congress, 1989-
90, pp. 1-17.
115
RELIGION AND RELIGIOSITY IN MODERN INDIA
This paper looks at the transition from a religious imagination to a
modern perception of secularism. It also attempts to integrate notions of
state, politics and self through their articulation in the space of religion.
Religion emerges both as a site of belief and faith as much as social protest.
1. Traditions of Epics texts :
A.K. Ramanujan, "Thee hundred Ramayanas : five examples and
three thoughts on translation", in Vinay Dharwadker ed. A.K.
Ramanujan's Collected essays (Delhi: Oxford University Press,
1999), pp. 131-60.
Philip Lutgendorf, "Words made flesh: the text enacted", in The Life of
a Text : Performing the Ramcaritmanas of Tulasidas (Delhi : Oxford
University Press, 1991), pp. 248-66.
2. Dissenting Reading of Religious Tradition :
Mark Juergensmeyer, "The rise of Ad Dharm", in Religion as Social
Vision: the Movement Against Untouchability in 20th century
Punjab (Berkeley : University of California Press, 1982), pp. 33-72.
R.S. Khare, The Untouchable as Himself (Cambridge : Cambridge
University Press, 1984), pp. 21-50.
3. Shared spaces of Religion :
Susan Bayly, "warrior martyr pirs in the 18th century", in Saints,
Goddesses and Kings : Muslims and Christians in South Indian
Society, 1700-1900 (Cambridge : Cambridge University Press,
1989), pp. 187-215.
Shahid Amin, "On retelling the Muslim Conquest of northern India", in
Partha Chatterjee and Anjan Ghosh ed., History and the Present (Delhi
: Permanent Black, 2004), pp. 24-43.
4. Politics of Religion :
Sarah Ansari, in Sufi Saints and State Power : the Pirs of
Sind, 1843-1947 (Cambridge Cambridge University Press, 1992), pp.
Peter van der Veer, "God must be liberated' : A Hindu Liberation
116
Movement in Ayodhya", in Modern Asian Studies, 21, 2, 1987,
pp.283-301.
5. Conversion and Identity :
Meera Kosambi, "An Indian Response to Christianity, Church and
Colonialism. The Case of Pandita Ramabai", Economic and Political
Weekly, XXVII, 43-4, 1992, pp. WS 61-71.
Valerian Rodrigues, "Making a Tradition Critical : Ambedkar's Reading
of Buddhism", in Peter Robb ed. Dalit Movements and the Meanings
of Labour in India (Delhi : Oxford University Press, 1993), pp.
299-339.
6. Religion and Secularism :
Romila Thapar, "Imagined Religious Communities? Ancient History
and the Modem Search for a Hindu Identity", Modern Asian Studies,
23, 2, 1989, pp . 209-31.
D.E. Smith, "India as a secular state", in Rajeev Bhargava ed. Secularism
and its Critics (Delhi : Oxford University Press, 1999), pp. 177-233.
General Reading
Kenneth Jones, Socio Religious Reform Movements in British India
(Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 1989).
Sunil Khilnani, The Idea of India (Delhi : Penguin Books, 1995).
Peter Hardy, The Muslims of British India (Cambridge : Cambridge
University Press, 1972)
Mushirul Hasan, Legacy of a Divided Nation : Indias Muslims since
Independence (Delhi : Manohar Publications)
C.J. Fuller, The Camphor Flame; Popular Hinduism and Society in
India (Princeton : Princeton University Press, 1992).
Peter van der Veer, Religious Nationalism : Hindus and Muslims in
India (Delhi : Oxford University Press, 1994).
117
INEQUALITY AND DIFFERENCE : ANCIENT INDIA
This course attempts to lay out the parameters of Indian history through
the theme of inequality and difference. Even as India evolved a composite
culture within a notion of civilizational unity, differences persisted and were
maintained. Using a variety of primary and secondary texts, key issues in
ancient Indian social history such as varna, jati, class caste, gender and
perceptions of cultural difference are explored.
1. Social stratification, with special reference to varna and jati.
The Purushashukta; transl. In Wendy Doniger O'Flaherty, The Rig
Veda: An Anthology (Penguin, 1981), pp. 29-32.
The Aggana Sutta, in T.W. Rhys Davids, Dialogues of the Buddha,
vol. 3, pp. 77-94 (Sacred Books of the Buddhist series).
The Manu Smriti; G. Buhler transl. The Laws of Manu (1886; New
Delhi rep. Edn. 1984), pp. 419-430 (on the duties of the varnas and
duties in times of distress).
2. Gender, family and the household.
Uma Chakravarti, "Exploring a 'No-Conflict Zone : Interest, Emotion
and the Family in Early India," in Studies in History, 18, 2, n.s. (2002),
pp. 165-187.
Kumkum Roy, "The King's Household : Structure and Space in the
Sastric Tradition," in Kumkum Sangari and Uma Chakravarti eds. From
Myths to Markets : Essays in Gender (Shimla and New Delhi, 2001,"
pp. 18-38.
Vijaya Ramaswamy, "Aspects of Women and Work in Early South
India," in The Indian Economic and Social History Review, 26 (1989),
pp. 81-99.
3. Slavery, untouchability.
Dev Raj Chanana, "Slavery in Ancient India : As Depicted in Pali and
Sanskrit Texts," Extracts in Aloka Parasher-Sen ed., Subordinate and
marginal Groups in Early India (N. Delhi, 2004), pp. 96-124.
Vivekanand Jha, "Stages in the History of Untouchables," Indian
Historical Review, vol. 2 No. 1 (July 1973), pp. 14-31.
118
4. Tribes and forest peopole; perceptions of cultural difference.
Andre Beteille, "The Definition of Tribe," Seminar, Oct. 1960.
N.K. Bose, "Some forest-dwelling communities" in idem. The Structure
of Hindu Society, pp. 29-40.
Brajadulal Chattopadhyaya, "Other, or the Others? Varieties of
Difference in Indian Society at the Turn of the First Millennium and
Their Historiographical Implications," in B. Chattopadhyaya, Studying
early India: Archaeology, Texts, and Historical Issues (New Delhi,
2003), pp. 191-213.
General Readings :
P.V. Kane, History of Dharmashastra, vol. II, part I Poona, 1941),
Chap. 2.
Uma Chakravarti, Gendering Caste : Through a Feminist Lens
(Calcutta, 2003).
Kumkum Roy ed. Women in Early Indian Societies (New Delhi, 1999).
Aloka Parasher-Sen ed., Subordinate and Marginal Groups in Early
India (N. Delhi, 2004), pp. 275-313.
Romila Thapar, "Perceiving the forest : early India,"in Studies in
History, vol. 17, No. 1, Jan.-June 2001, pp. 1-16.
V. Jha, "Candala and the Origin of Untouchability." Indian Historical
Review, 13, no. 1-2 (July 1986-Jan 1987), pp. 1-36.
S.C. Dube, Indian Society (N. Delhi, 1990).
Dipankar Gupta ed., Social Stratification (New Delhi, 1991).
R.S. Sharma, Shudras in Ancient India (Delhi, 1983).
119
INEQUALITY AND DIFFERENCE : MEDIEVAL INDIA
This course attempts to lay out the parameters of Indian history through
the theme of inequality and difference. In the Middle ages, with the formation
of authoritarian regimes, the expansion of agrarian societies, and the
emergence of pan-regional market economics, rather unique ways of
articulating individual and collective identities, noting differences, formulating,
displaying and reproducing social and economic inequalities came into being.
Required readings :
1. Class inequalities :
Zia al-Din Barani, 'Advice XIX : On the Noble Birth of the Supporters
of the State' and 'Advice XXI: On the High Born and the Low Born',
trans., Mohammad Habib and Dr. Mrs. Afsar Umar Salim Khan,
Fatawa-i-Jahandari : The Political Theory of the Delhi Sultanate,
(Allahabad : Kitab Mahal, nd.), pp. 91-6, 97-100.
Satish Chandra, 'The Structure of Village Society in northen India : the
Khud-kasht and Pahi-kasht', in Medieval India : Society, the
Jagirdari Crisis and the Village, (Delhi: Macmillan India, 1986 reprint),
pp. 29-45.
Irfan Habib, "Forms of class struggle in Mughal India", in Essays in
Indian History : Towards a Marxist Perspective, (Delhi : Tulika,
1995), pp. 233-258.
2. Slavery and Caste :
Sunil Kumar, 'When Slaves were Nobles', Studies in History, ns 10
(1994), pp. 23-52.
Sumit Guha and Indrani Chatterjee, 'Slave-queen, Waif-prince : Slavery
and Social Capital in Eighteenth-Century India', Indian Economic and
Social History Review, vol. 36, (1999), pp. 165- 86.
Salim Kidwai, "Sultans, eunuchs and domestics : new forms of bondage
in medieval India", in Utsa Patnaik and Dingwaney ed. Chains of
Servitude : bondage and slavery in India. Madras : Sangam Books,
1985), pp. 76-96.
Irfan Habib, "Caste in Indian History", in Essays in Indian History:
Towards a Marxist Perspective, (Delhi : Tulika, 1995), pp. 161-79.
120
3. Narrating Differences :
Romila Thapar, 'The Tyranny of Labels', in Cultural Pasts: Essays in
Early Indian History, (Delhi : OUP, 2000), pp. 990-1014.
Cynthia Talbot, 'Inscribing the Other, Inscribing the Self: Hindu-Muslim
Identities in Pre-Colonial India', in Richard Eaton, India's Islamic
Tradition, 711-1750, (Delhi : OUP, 2003), pp. 83-117.
Sanjay Subrahmanyam, 'Taking Stock of the Franks: South Asian Views
of Europeans and Europe, 1500-1800', Indian Economic and Social
History Review, vol. 42 (2005).
5. Lordship and hierarchy :
Velcheru Narayana Rao, David Shulman and Sanjay Subrahmanyam,
'The Rhetoric of Kingship' in Symbols of Substance : Court and
State in Noyaka Period Tamilnadu, (Delhi : OUP, 1992), pp. 169-
188.
Norbert Peabody, 'In whose turban does the lord reside?: Kings, saints
and merchants in western India', in Hindu Kingship and Polity in
Precolonial India, (Cambridge : University Press, 2003), pp. 50-79.
6. Gender difference - inequality :
A.K. Ramanaujan, 'On Women Saints', John S. Hawley, and Donna
M. Wulff, The Divine Consort : Radha and the Goddesses of India, (Boston
: Beacon Press, 1982), pp. 316-26.
John Stratton Hawley and Mark Juergensmeyer, Songs of the Saints
of India (New York : Oxford University Press, 1988), chatper on
Mirabai, pp. 119-40.
General Reading
Irfan Habib, Essays in Indian History : Towards a Marxist
Perspective, (Delhi : Tulika, 1995).
Louise Marlow, Hierarchy and Egalitarianism in Islamic Thought,
(Cambridge : University Press, 1997).
121
Cynthia Talbot, Precolonial India in Practice: Society, Region and
Identity in Medieval Andhra, (Delhi : OUP, 2001).
Frederique Apffel Marglin, Wives of the God-King, The Rituals of
the Devadasis of Puri, (Dehli : OUP, 1985), pp. 46-88.
Women bhakta poets, Manushi Special issue, 50-52, 1989.
122
INEQULITY AND DIFFERENCE : MODERN INDIA
In the modern period, under the impact of colonialism and a renewed
engagement with tradition by indigenous intellectuals as well as the conscious
attempt to frame the history of India in terms of equality and justice,
differences were negotiated and transformed. The course looks at the
persisting search for equality and for a politics that engages with the idea
of difference within evolving political frameworks.
1. Caste
Jotirao Phule, "Slavery", in G.P. Deshpande ed. Selected Writings of
Jotirao Phule (Delhi : Leftword Books, 2002), pp. 26-46.
B.R. Ambedkar, What Congress and Gandhi have Done to the
Untouchables (Bombay : Thaker and Co., 1946), pp. 126-64.
2. Gender
Lata Mani, "Abstract disquisitions : bhadralok and the normative
violence of sati", in Contentious Traditions : the Debate on Sati in
Colonial India Contentious Traditions : the Debate on Sati in
Colonial India (Delhi : Oxford University Press, 1998), pp. 42-82.
Gali Minault, "Role Models : Educated Muslim women-real and ideal",
in Secluded Scholars: Women's Education and Social Reform in
Colonial India (Delhi : Oxford University Press, 1999), pp. 14-57.
3. Social Movements
V. Geetha and S. Rajadurai, "Problems of caste and the new order", in
Towards a Non-Brahmin Millenium: from lyothee Dass to Periyar
(Calcutta: Samya Publications, 1998), pp. 351-77.
Sekhar Bandyopadhyaya, Caste, Protest and Identity in Colonial India:
the Namasudras of Bengal 1872-1947 (Richmond: Curzon Press,
1997).
4. Tribe
David Hardiman, "Assertion, conversion and Indian nationalism:
Govind's movement amount the Bhils", in Rowena Robinson and
Sathianathan Clarke ed., Religious conversion in India: Modes,
Motivation and Meanings (Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2003),
pp. 255-84.
123
Sanjib Baruah, "Confronting constructionism : ending the Naga war",
in Durable Disorder : understanding the politics of North East
India (Delhi : Oxford University Press, 2005), pp. 98-122.
5. Religious communities
Gyanendra Pandey, "Disciplining difference", in remembering
Partitions: Violence, Nationalism and History in India (Cambridge
: Cambridge University Pres 2001), pp. 152-74.
Omvedt, "Colonial challenges, Indian responses and Buddhist revival",
in Buddhism in India: Challenging Brahmanism and Caste (New Delhi
: Sage Publication, 2003), pp. 217-42.
6. Development in Modern India
Amita Baviskar, In the Belly of the River: Tribal Conflict over
Development in the Narmada Valley (Delhi: Oxford University Press,
1995), pp.
Partha Chatterjee, "Development planning and the Indian State", in
Terence J. Byres ed. The State, Development Planning and
Liberalization in India (Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1998),
pp. 82-103.
General Reading
Susan Bayly,, Caste Society and Politics in India from the 18th
century to the Modern Age (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,
1999).
M.N. Srinivas, Social Change in Modern India (Hyderabad: Orient
Longman, 1977).
Geraldine Forbes, Women in Colonial India (Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press,)
Andre Beteille, Society and Politics in India (London: Athlone Press,
1991).
Francine Frankel, India's Political Economy, 1947-77: the Gradual
revolution (Princton : Oricenton University Press, 1978).
124
Paul Brass, The Politics of India since Independence (Cambridge:
Cambridge University Press, 1990).
Oliver Mendelsohn ad Marika Vicziany, The Untouchables:
subordinateion poverty and the state in Modern India (Cambridge:
Cambridge Press, 1998).
125
SOCIOLOGY OF CONTEMPORARY INDIA
1. Understanding India
(a) India as an object of Study
(b) Tradition and Modernity
(c) India as a plural society
(d) Social Movements.
2. Social Institutions and Practices
(a) Caste
(b) Tribes
(c) Class
(d) Village
(e) Family and Kinship
(f) Gender
Readings:
1. B.S. Cohn. 1987. An Anthropologist among the Historians and other
Essays. Delhi: OUP. (Chapter 1).
2. Milton Singer. 1972. When a Great Tradition Modernizes. New York:
Praeger Press. (Chapter 5 and 9).
3. Mukul Kesavan. 2002. Secular Common Sense. New Delhi: Penguin.
4. T.N. Madan (ed). 2004. India’s Religions. Delhi: OUP. (Chapter 1).
5. Phillip Mason. 1967. India and Ceylon: Unity and Diversity. Delhi:
OUP. (Chapter 3).
6. M.S. Gore. (2002). Unity in Diversity: The Indian Experience in
Nation Building. Delhi: Rawat Publications. (Chapter 6).
7. M. L. Dantwalla. H. Sethi and P. Visaria (ed) 1998. Social Change
Through : Voluntary Action. New Delhi: Sage Publications. Pp 74-
92.
8. M.N. Srinivas. 1969. The Caste System in India. In Andre Beteille
(ed) Social Inequality. England: Penguin Books.
9 Gail Omvedt. 1995. Dalit Visions: The anti-caste movement and the
construction of an Indian identity. Delhi: Orient Longman.
126
10. C.J. Fuller. 1991. Kerala Christians and the Caste System. In
Dipankar Gupta Social Stratification. Delhi: OUP.
11. Virginius Xaxa. 2002. “Tribes in India”. In Veena Das (ed) The
Encyclopaedia of Sociology and Social Anthropology. Pp 373-408.
12. Andre Beteille. 1974. Studies in Agrarian Social Structure. Delhi:
OUP. (Chapter 1).
13. Mark Holmstrom. 1991. “Who are the Working Class?” In Dipankar
Gupta (ed). Social Stratification. Delhi: OUP.
14. Jan Breman. et.al. 1997. The Village in Asia Revisited. Delhi: OUP.
(Introduction. Pp. 126-174).
15. Viramma, Jociane Racine and Jean-Luc Racine. 2000. Viramma: Life
of a Dalit. New Delhi: Social Science Press.
16 A.M. Shah. 1998. Critical Essays on the Family in India. Delhi: Orient
Longman. (Chapters 2, 3).
17. Patricia Uberoi (ed.). 1993. Family Kinship and Marriage in India.
Delhi: OUP. (Chapters 1 & 15).
18. Rajeshwari Sunder Rajan. 2003. Scandal of the State Duke: Duke
University Press (Chapter 6).
19. Uma Chakravarti. 2003. Gendering Caste: Through a Feminist Lens.
Calcutta: Stree. (Chapters 2 & 9).
127
GEOGRAPHY
Principles of Geography
Unit I - Introduction
* Definition, nature and scope of Geography
* Concepts : Location, space, place, region, spatial interaction
* Methods & Techniques : Elements of maps, remot sensing and GIS
Unit II-Physical Geography
* Internal structure on the earth
* Plate Tectonics: Plate movements and interactions; volcanism,
earthquakes, mountain building
* Landform Development: Geographical cycle of W.M. Davis
* Atmospheric circulation and composition
Unit III -Human Geography
* World Population: Growth and distribution; demographic transition
model
* Settlements: Definition, types and patterns, Christaller’s central place
theory
Unit IV -Economic Geography
* Agriculture: Determinants of agriculture, types of agriculture -
Intensive subsistence and commercial farming; Von Thunen’s Model
* Industry: Factors of industrial location, Weber’s theory of industrial
location major industrial regions
Suggested Readings
1. Alexander, J.W. and Hartshorne, T. (1988), Economic Geography,
New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
2. Chandna, R. C. (2000), Geography of Population, New Delhi:
Kalyani Publishers.
3. Conte, D. J. and Thomson, D. J. (1994), Earth Sciences, New York:
John Wiley and Sons.
4. Danial, P. and Hopkinson, M. (1994), The Geography of Settlements,
Harlow, Essex: Oliver and Boyd.
5. Fellmann, J. D., Getis, A. and Getis, J. (2003), Human Geography:
Landscapes of Human Activities, New Delhi: McGraw Hill.
128
6. Leong, G. C. and Morgan, G. L. (2004), Human and Economic
Geography, Delhi: Oxford University Press.
7. Rubenstein, J. M. (2004), Cultural Landscape: An Introduction to
Human Geography, Prentice Hall.
8. Singh, S. (2000), Physical Geography, Allahabad: Prayag Pustak
Bhawan.
9. Strahler, A. H. and Strahler, A. N. (1997), Physical Geography:
Science and Systems of the Human Environment, New York: John
Wiley and Sons.
10. Strahler, A. H. and Strahler, A. N. (2000), Introducing Physical
Geography, New York: John Wiley and Sons.
129
GEOGRAPHY OF INDIA
Unit I : Physical Base
* Physiographic divisions
* Climate -Distribution of temperature and precipitation, mechanism
of monsoons
* Soil and vegetation -Types and distribution
Unit II: Human Dimensions ..
* Population distribution
* Growth
* Problems and policies
Unit III: Economic Activities
* Agricultural landuse and cropping patterns; Green Revolution and
White Revolution
* Infrastructural development - Roads, railways and power
* Industrial regions and complexes
* Information technology & services
Unit IV: Contemporary Issues
* Urbanization and metropolitanization
* Food security
* Land degradation
* Natural hazards and disasters
Suggested Readings:
1. Barrow, C.J. (1994), Land Degradation, Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press, pp 1-20.
2. Bhargava, K.K. and Khatri, S.K. (eds), (2002), South Asia 2010:
Challenges and Opportunites, Konark Publishers, Delhi, pp. 173-195.
3. Chand, M. and Puri, V.K. (2004), Regional Planning in India, Allied
Publishers Pvt. Ltd., Mumbai, pp. 219-267.
4. Chandna, R.C. (2000), A Geography of Population, Kalyani Publishers,
Ludhiana, pp.68-84.
5. Govt. of India: INDIA: Annual Reference, New Delhi: Publication
Division, Ministry of Information and Technology.
130
6. Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research: India Development
Report: A Annual Reference, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
7. Johnson, B.L.C. (1980), India: Resources and Development, New
Delhi (India): Arnold-Heinemann Publishers.
8. Mamorria, C.B., Economic and Commercial Geography of India, .Agra:
Shivlal Aggarwal and Co.
9. Pal, S.K. (1997), Physical Geography of India: A Study in Regional
Earth Sciences, Hyderabad :Orient Longman.
10. Raychaudhuri, S.P.(1996), Land and Soil, New Delhi: National Book
Trust of India.
11. Sharma, J.C.Bharat Ka Praroop, Merrut: Kedar Nath Ram Nath.
12. Sharma, T .C.(2003), India: An Economic and Commercial Geography,
Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.
13. Tewari, V.N., Bharat Ka Bhugolik Swaroop, Agra: Ram Prasad and
Sons.
14. Tirtha, Ranjit and Krishan, Gopal (1996), Geography of India, New
Delhi : Rawat Publication.
131
ALGEBRA AND CALCULUS
(Other than Economics) (II Year)
(3 lectures per week)
Unit-I Algebra and Geometry 12 marks
R, R2 , R3 as Vector Spaces over R. Standard basis for each of them.
Concept of linear independence. Matrices, basic concepts and algebraic
operations. Determinants. System of linear equations and their solutions.
Methods for finding inverse of a matrix.
Cramer’s rule. Solution of problems arising in psychology, geography and
other Social Sciences.
Cartesian Coordinates in 2 and 3 dimensions. Techniques of tracing of
standard curves like straight lines, circle, ellipse, parabola and hyperbola.
Reflection Property.
Interpretation of Equations for surfaces like Sphere, Cones, Ellipsoid and
their pictures.
Functions and analysis of graphical infomation. Graphs of functions such
as polynomials, trigonometric functions, exponential and logarithmic
functions, inverse trigonometric functions arising in problems of geography,
politica1 science, psychology etc. such as growth, decay and population
growth. Concept of shifting and scaling of graphs.
Unit-II: Calculus-l 14 marks
Concept of limit and continuity along with the intuitive and graphical
approach. Input output examples for motivation.
Statement and implication of intermediate value theorem and other properties
such as maximum and minimum attained for continuous functions on closed
bounded intervals Examples from common everyday phenomena related
to social sciences and humanities. Differentiation and derivatives of first
and second order. Statement and interpretation of algebra of derivatives.
The derivative in graphing and applications. Slope of a graph, tangent lines.
Increasing and decreasing behaviour of a function. Concavity and convexity.
Maxima, minima and point of inflexion. Applications to problems in Social
Sciences.
132
Statements, interpretation and practical app1ications of Rolle’s theorem
and Lagrange’s mean value theorem.
Sequences to be introduced through the examples arising in social sciences
beginning with finite sequences, followed by concepts of recursion and
difference equations. The Fibonacci sequence arising from the branching
habit of trees and the breeding habit of rabbits.
Intuitive idea of the convergence of series, especially geometric series.
Taylor and Maclaurin series formula for exp x. log (l+x), sin x, cos x.
Unit-III: Calculus-II 12 marks
Integration of simple trigonometric, rational and irrational functions.
Concept of definite integral as sum of limits. Calculation of area and length
of curves with emphasis on solution of problems arising in geography,
psychology and other social sciences. Mathematical modelling with
differential equations of first order. Formulation and verification of solution
of differential equations such as population growth and spread of disease.
References:
1. H.Anton, I.Bivens and S. Davis: Calculus, John Wiley and Sons (Asia),
2002.
2. B. Thomas, R.L. Finey: Calculus and Analytic Geometry, Pearson
Education (Singapore), 2001.
3. T.M.Apostol, Calculus, volume I. John Wiley and Sons (Asia) Ltd.,
2002.
4. H.S. Bear, Understanding Calculus, .John Wiley and Sons, 2003.
133
MATHEMATICAL METHODS
(Other than Economics) (II year)
(3 lectures a week)
Emphasis will be on examples from Social Sciences and Humanities :
Unit-I Approximation and Numerical Methods 13 marks
Linearization and differentials, estimating change with differentials, the error
in approximation. Newton’s method or funding roots, particularly of
polynomia1 equations.
Concept of sum of a series, Infinite Geometric series. Series formulas for
exp x, log(1+x) and their use in polynomia1 approximation and error
estimation.
Numenca1 integration: Simpson’s rule, trapezoida1 approximation.
Roots of equations: bisection method, method of false position, Newton-
Raphson method. Solution of linear equations: Gauss elimination, Gauss-
Seidel method.
Programming: Data types, variables, control structure, functions and
modules, arrays, interface with databases.
Unit-II : Statistica1 Methods 17 marks
Skewness, Kurtosis, Elementary Probability and basic laws. Discrete and
continuous random variables. Mathematica1 expectation, mean and
variance of binomial, Poisson and norma1 distributions; norma1 distribution
curve.
Sample mean, sampling variance, standard error, confidence interval,
t-test, z-test. Chi-square goodness of fit. Analysis of variance for one way
classification. Least squares method. Correlation, multiple correlation, linear
regression. Concept of multiple regression. Elementary Factor analysis.
Use of standard softwares (spreadsheets) for simple statistical analysis.
Unit-III : Linear Programming and Game Theory 8 marks
Formation of linear programming problem (LPP), graphica1 method, solving
simple LPP by simplex method.
134
Theory of Games: Introduction to basic concepts of game theory including
strategic games examples like prisoner’s dilemma. Principle of dominance.
Notion of zero sum and non-zero sum games. Formulation of two person
zero sum game and strategies for players. Solution of simple games.
Recommended Books:
1. R.J.Shavelson, Statistical Reasoning for the Behavioural Sciences,
AIIyn and Bacon, Inc. 1981.
2. B.E. James and G.M.Barber, Elementary Statistics for Geographers,
The Guieford Press, London, 1996.
3. G.B. Thomas and R.L. Finney. Calculus and Analytic Geometry,
Pearson Education, 2001.
4. V. Rajaraman, Fundamentals of Computers, Prentice Hall of India,
2002.
5. S.S.Hillier and G.J. Lieberman, Introduction to Operational Research,
Tata McGraw Hill, 2001.
Project Work for Internal Assessment
Project based on
1. Statistical Analysis using an appropriate computing tool.
2. Analysis and approximation of experimental data e.g. coastal
disturbances, floods, cyclone, election results, child Psychology and
behavourial patterns etc.
135
ELEMENTS OF ANALYSIS
Economics (II Year)
(3 lectures per week)
Unit I: Real Sequences 16 marks
Finite and infinite sets examples of countable and uncountable sets.
Real line; absolute value bounded sets suprema and infima, statement
of order completeness property of R, Archimedean property of R,
intervals. Real sequences, convergence, sum and product of
convergent sequences, proof of convergence of some simple
sequences such as (-1)n /n, 1/n2, (1+1/n)n, xn with |x| < 1,an/n,where
an is a bounded sequence. Concept of cluster points and statement
of Bolzano Weierstrass’ theorem. Statement and illustration of
Cauchy convergence criterion for sequences. Cauchy’s theorem on
limits, order preservation and squeeze theorem, monotone sequences
and their convergence.
Unit II: Infinite Series 12 marks
Definition and a necessary condition for convergence of an infinite series.
Cauchy convergence criterion for series, positive term series,geometric
series, comparison test, limit comparison test, convergence of p-series, Root
test, Ratio test, alternating series, Leibnitz’s test. Definition and examples
of absolute and conditional convergence.
Unit III: Power series 10 marks
Definition of power series: radius of convergence, Cauchy-Hadamard
theorem, statement and illustration of term-by-term differentiation and
integration of power series. Power series expansions for exp(x), sin(x),
cos(x), log(1+x) and their properties.
Recommended books:
1. R. G. Bartle and D. R. Sherbert: Introduction to Real Analysis, John
Wiley and Sons (Asia) Pte. Ltd., 2000.
2. C. P. Simon and L. Blume: Mathematics for Economists, W W Norton
and Company, 1994.
3. K.Sydsaeter and P.J. Hammod, Mathematics for Economic Analysis,
Pearson Education, 2002.
136
LINEAR ALGEBRA AND CALCULUS
Economics (II Year)
(3 lectures per week)
Unit I: Linear Algebra 16 marks
Rn as a vector space over R, subspaces of Rn, linear independence and
linear span, standard basis for Rn and examples of different bases in R2
and R3. Linear transformations from Rn to Rm, null space, range space,
statement and illustration of the rank-nullity theorem, matrix of a linear
transformation with respect to standard basis, matrices as linear
transformations.Hermitian, unitary and normal matrices.
Rn as a real inner product space (dot product), orthogonality, length of a
vector, examples of orthonormal basis, Pythagoras’ theorem, Cauchy-
Schwartz Inequality.
Unit II: Real valued functions of one variable 12 marks
Limit and continuity of real valued functions of one variable, sum and product
of continuous functions, sign preserving property for continuous functions,
intermediate value theorem, extreme value theorem for continuous functions.
Derivability of real valued functions of one variable, Rolle’s theorem, mean
value theorem.
Unit III: Calculus of several variables 10 marks
Definition and examples of sequences, open sets, closed sets, compact
sets, connected subsets of R1 and R2 Limit and continuity for real valued
functions on R2, differentiability of real valued functions on R2, directional
derivatives and gradients for these functions.Statement of Taylor’s theorem
for functions of two variables, Maxima and Minima of functions of two
variables.
Recommended books:
1. T. M. Apostol: Calculus, Volume 1, John Wiley and Sons (Asia) Pvt.
Ltd., 2002.
2. R. G. Bartle and D. R. Sherbert: Introduction to real analysis, John
Wiley and Sons (Asia) Pte. Ltd. 2000.
137
3. H. Anton, I Bivens and S. Davis: Calculus, John Wiley and Sons (Asia)
Pvt. Ltd., 2002.
4. C. P. Simon and L. Blume: Mathematics for Economists, W W Norton
and Company, 1994.


Reference: http://www.du.ac.in/course/syllabi/ba-h-new.pdf


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