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  • Category: Miscellaneous

    Do we really know the meaning of gentleman?

    My question is very simple but I have observed that from the beginning of school days, students are taught that the person who is well suited-and-booted is called the gentleman. The picture in the book also shows a gentleman with a suit and boots.

    In our society, we can observe a similar pattern where a well suited and booted person is considered the so-called gentleman. Do we not know the real meaning of gentleman? Why do we consider these well suited-booted persons as gentlemen?

    Members are requested to share their opinion in this thread.
  • #652866
    This is the culture left behind in India by the British. They have gone out of India. But the habits they taught us are still with us. Gandhiji is a very gentleman. We all know and accept this. But we never see his picture with a suit and shoe. It is better if we show his photo or figure to our children and tell them that a gentleman should be like this. Then when they read the history of Gandhiji they will understand how a gentleman should be and what is the real meaning of a gentleman.
    Many times many people deceive us by behaving like a gentleman without disclosing his true colours. After some time only we will understand the nature of the person. A man will become a gentleman with his behaviour and attitude but not by the way of dress up. This is to be explained to our children by the elders.

    drrao
    always confident

  • #652867
    In my opinion, the person who is calm, polite, intelligent, protects himself and takes care of others, understands emotion is a gentleman. He lives his life with honesty.

    Today when we address men in a gathering we call gentlemen, it doesn't matter if they have all these qualities. We just address them by saying it.

    In the past, people used to call a male a gentleman if he is dressed well, is rich and have lots of followers which I think was wrong. A person should have some quality to be called a gentleman.

    Sanjeev

    " It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not" ... Andre Gide

  • #652869
    A very interesting thread. It is very correct that we should not judge a person by his dress or attire. That is only an apparent thing visible to us.

    What matters is his behaviour, ettiquette and nature. If he confirms well to these parameters then only we can call him a gentleman.

    It is a tradition to call a well dressed person a gentleman as a courtesy in society. Just a way of addressing them.

    Knowledge is power.

  • #652888
    A wonderful thread by the author and a pertinent one keeping in mind the happenings around us.

    A person who behaves gently with others and whose action is in sync with what he is saying is a gentleman. The picture of a gentleman in the books that we read during childhood is shown based on few assumptions. People used to think that a well-dressed man must be well-natured also, which doesn't hold good in any way. Though dress plays a very important role to create an impression, the dress does not say anything about a person's quality. Only after interacting with a person it is understood how she/he behaves, acts and treats others.

    Naturally when a person is well dressed, people can think that the activities of that person will also be good. While importance of being well-dressed is necessary, children should also be taught about what makes a man a gentleman. The nature and quality of a person are the things to judge to know whether he is a gentleman.

    Sankalan

    "Life is easier when you enjoy what you do"

  • #653014
    Connected with this, I also have a doubt. Why everybody start a speech with "Ladies and Gentlemen" ? Why only the males alone are gentle ? Of course, this is also copied from the English people. We have read the famous speech by Swami Vivekananda, made in US. He started his speech with "Brothers and Sisters of America", which was appreciated by the complete audience. It was a deviation from the routine 'ladies and gentlemen'.
    This indicate that the usage 'gentlemen' was only to indicate male supremacy, naturally originated by some male-maniac.

    tmsankaran

  • #653019
    The word 'gentleman' must stick to its usage as a way to address a man. The literal meaning of gentleman does not resemble with every male folk around us. Thus, it is better not to get confused and apply the word on to every single man.
    Seriously speaking after the #Me Too movement it has become more difficult to label who the gentleman is! Any human being, be a man or a woman, must be adjudged by their action and attitude. Neither a proper dress nor wealth or education can make a person worth respectable.
    It's the purity of inner self that matters the most. A man, poor or wealthy, can be a gem of a person if he knows how to treat people respectfully. Such type of a person is the richest man, and the gentleman tag suits him the most.

    shampasaid

  • #653022
    A man becomes a 'gentleman' by his behaviour, attitude, mentality, overall bearing and education (not always academic). It is definitely not related to western dress but it is expected that a gentleman will always wear a sober dress fit for the particular occasion.
    Beware! I question everything and everybody.

  • #653026
    A cool headed and courteous person can be termed as a gentleman ignoring what attire he is putting on.

    In British time, any person in suit and tie was called as gentleman whether he had those properties or not.

    Thoughts exchanged is knowledge gained.


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