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  • Category: Miscellaneous

    100 years of Jallianwala Bagh massacre: We must also know about other massacres

    100 years of that painful event have passed. On the day of Baisakhi in 1919, the British force under General Dyer killed around 1600 people who came to a closed ground in Amritsar to celebrate Baisakhi. I wrote a post on Sardar Udham Singh, Shahid-e-Azam, how he took revenge on Michael O'Dwyer in 1940 and got rid of his own nightmare. Now, I could not trace this post despite searching it for quite some time.

    Six years before this painful killing, in 1913, the British and some local kings of Rajputana killed rural Bheels at Mangarh where they assembled for a carnival. I wrote about this massacre in the following article: The Mangarh massacre, but I doubt if Members have read this.

    Now, I will write about Chuknagar massacre. I know that very few know about this terrible massacre which took place in May 1971. Pakistani soldiers and their Bangladeshi friends killed at least 10,000 unarmed Hindus who were fleeing from East Pakistan to West Bengal. I feel it is my duty to remember these departed souls.

    When we are remembering the deads in Jallianwala Bagh, I take a resolve to write about the hapless deads of Chuknagar, whom almost all have forgotten.
  • #662396
    I did not know this. Such a barbaric act. It is the history that keeps a record of these things. Only people interested in history might be aware of such large scale massacre. Many such painful events are registered in the books of history.
    Thoughts exchanged is knowledge gained.

  • #662398
    Yes, it is correct and we should know about the other massacres and the history of the country as well. We all know about the Jalianwala Bagh massacre but I have never heard about the Chuknagar massacre. During my school days, I was not fond of reading history though later on, I realised how important it is to know the history. Any history can be said as documented evidence of certain facts and from each one of them we get to know many things about it. We get to know how a particular situation was tackled at that time and also about what were the drawbacks of that period. This helps to rectify our actions later.

    I thank the author for bringing out this thread about another dreadful massacre and hope to read in details about it when it is posted here in ISC.

    Sankalan

    "Life is easier when you enjoy what you do"

  • #662403
    Did any of you hear about Mangarh massacre of 1913? The British soldiers fired Heavy Machine Guns (HMGs) on the simple Bheels. I wrote an article on this massacre in this platform.

    Chuknagar is in Khulna district of present Bangladesh. The next day of the massacre, the local people from the majority community threw away the dead bodies in ponds and in the river.

    'Nayak nahin; Khalnayak hoon main' (I am not the hero; I am the villain)

  • #662410
    I know about the Jalianwala Bagh massacre but I never heard about the Chuknagar massacre. This act speaks about the mentality of the armed forces of those two countries.
    Partha, as a history-loving person, you are always bringing these unknown incidents to our notice and we are learning many issues from you. I should thank you for your efforts in taking time and writing on such incidents. Sometimes when I read these facts I don't understand how our leaders tolerated all their misdeeds and patiently waiting for a change in the attitudes of our neighbouring countries.

    drrao
    always confident

  • #662470
    It is sad that such atrocities have happened in the past, many countries would have such massacres in their troubled history. Unfortunately, all such events do not get a mention in the books or the daily papers or websites during the anniversaries (like that of Jallianwala Bagh incident). Our respects to the departed souls.

  • #662479
    There are many such things happened in history which is not known to us. They have remained under the carpet forever.
    No life without Sun

  • #662678
    In the post, I wrote: "I wrote a post on Sardar Udham Singh, Shahid-e-Azam, how he took revenge on Michael O'Dwyer in 1940 and got rid of his own nightmare. Now, I could not trace this post despite searching it for quite some time."

    Now, after the sustained effort, I somehow managed to find the post on Sardar Udham Singh. I am giving the link below:- He was no longer haunted by nightmares

    'Nayak nahin; Khalnayak hoon main' (I am not the hero; I am the villain)

  • #662682
    A good thread indeed but don't you feel that I am a secular person of this Democratic nation & under the Constitution of India & therefore I absolutely restrain myself from such incidences or else I would be referred to as not secular as the author has already proved of himself & this is not good for our society.
    .
    .
    And observe the people around who still couldn't feel the difference of what we have lost & mentally retarded for acknowledging those behind these.

  • #662684
    Just like terrorism has no religion (I laugh out loudly), similarly, the dead has no religion. So, massacre is massacre. The killing of innocent Bheels at Mangarh, the killing of innocent Sikhs at Jallianwala Bagh and the killing of Bengali Hindus at Chuknagar are all massacres. We all must know about these massacres and also who committed these crimes.
    'Nayak nahin; Khalnayak hoon main' (I am not the hero; I am the villain)

  • #662822
    Two MPs from Kerala, MB Rajesh (CPM) and Shashi Tharoor (INC),both are demanding an apology from British Government for Jallianwalah bagh massacre.
    Why they are demanding apology now? After 100 years of incident?
    If they apologize, are they liable to pay compensation?
    Massacres are sadistic events. As time changes morality also changes. Why revive history?


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